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 Descubren momias falsas en los museos Vaticanos

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MensajeTema: Descubren momias falsas en los museos Vaticanos   Jue Ene 22, 2015 3:55 am

Descubren momias falsas en los museos Vaticanos


Pese a parecer de época faraónica, fueron fabricadas en algún momento del siglo XIX, cuando el antiguo Egipto suscitaba un enorme interés
Los Museos Vaticanos albergaban entre su vasto patrimonio cultural dos momias que, pese a parecer de época faraónica, fueron fabricadas en algún momento del siglo XIX, cuando el antiguo Egipto suscitaba un enorme interés.

Estas dos momias miden aproximadamente 60 centímetros de longitud, han sido investigadas durante el último año y una de ellas ya ha sido restaurada, según publica «Il Corriere della Sera».

«Los resultados de los análisis han revelado que están fabricadas con el mismo método y que presentan las mismas particularidades», comenta al diario Alessia Amenta, directora de la sección Antiguo Egipto y Oriente Próximo del museo. Ella ha sido la encargada de dirigir las investigaciones y ha contado con la ayuda del profesor Ulderico Santamaria y su asistente Fabio Morresi.
http://www.abc.es/cultura/20150121/abci-momias-egipcias-museos-vaticanos-201501211623.html





El único elemento de época faraónica hallado en las momias son las propias vendas, que datan del año 2.000 a.C y que, sin embargo, están recubiertas por una resina que solo se encuentra en Europa. «Las vendas son de época faraónica pero cubiertas por una resina que no se encuentra en Egipto sino en Europa», explicó Amenta.

Asimismo dijo que el rostro infantil representado sobre las vendas fue dibujado en una lámina de estaño y cubierto por una resina para dotarle de un aspecto de dorado antiguo, «una técnica típica del siglo XIX inglés».

En relación con su contenido, una tomografía (Tac) realizada en el Hospital G.Martino de Messina sobre una de las momias ha revelado que en su interior solo hay «una tibia humana, pero de un adulto de época medieval». «Un montaje estudiado para engañar a los coleccionistas más incautos», señaló la profesora.

En el siglo XIX estalló una auténtica pasión por todo lo relacionado con Egipto a raíz de las campañas militares de Napoleón Bonaparte, el descubrimiento de la piedra de Rosetta y la traducción de sus jeroglíficos por parte de Jean-François Champollion. Era la época del Romanticismo y los viajeros que atravesaban Egipto, mayoritariamente británicos, solían regresar a casa con una de estas piezas, que exhibían muchas veces sin ser conscientes del fraude.

El periódico informa de que Amenta ha localizado otras cuarenta momias falsas esparcidas por los museos de toda Europa. Por el momento se desconoce la procedencia de las del Vaticano pero los organizadores del museo ya están preparando una instalación para darlas a conocer al público
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MensajeTema: Re: Descubren momias falsas en los museos Vaticanos   Jue Ene 22, 2015 6:00 am

Archaeologists and experts say two mummies in the Vatican Museum are fakes

The two mini mummies were long believed to be of a child, animal or possibly a falcon but can now be revealed as forgeries


By Andrea Vogt, Bologna

7:58PM GMT 21 Jan 2015





Researchers studying mummies housed in the Vatican Museums have said they have discovered that two of them are fakes.


“These mummies are important evidence of the phenomenon of falsification that managed to regularly fool collectors and sometimes scholars,” said Alessia Amenta, Egyptologist and curator of the Vatican Museum’s department for the antiquities of Egypt and the Near East.


Scientists at the Vatican Museum’s diagnostic laboratory for conservation and restoration have been analysing the two mummy forgeries for the last year, and say they can finally reveal the techniques charlatans used to pass them off as real. They present their research on Thursday in Rome, finally unmasking the myth of these two mini mummies, which were long believed to be of a child, animal or possibly a falcon.


The two fakes are among the 9 full mummified bodies and 18 body parts housed in Vatican Museum collections. Researchers initiated the Vatican Mummy Project in 2007 to start cataloguing, studying and conserving the human specimens, which need special climate control systems to slow the decaying process and protect precious DNA that could shed new light on genetic evolution of today’s diseases.


The mummification treatment and wrapping of the corpse to preserve the body for eternity was practiced in ancient Egypt for nearly four thousand years. Many mummies managed to survive intact today, but there are also dozens of fakes dating back to the “mummy mania” era that exploded after Napoleon’s 1798 expedition to Egypt. In the US and Britain especially, public unwrappings of ancient remains were a popular “afternoon tea” spectacle, with onlookers sometimes paying handsomely to see what was inside.


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When Vatican researchers set out to do their own “unwrapping” of the two 60-centimetre long mummies, they found that in fact the bandages date back to ancient Egypt, but that was about all. The three-dimensional painted coverings made of plaster and linen bandages -- called cartonnage -- had a yellowish resin that researchers say is unique to Europe in the mid-19th century, often used in Britain to give antiques a gilded coating.

A 3D CAT scan revealed that inside the bandages was a human shinbone, the tibia of an adult from medieval times.

X-Rays, CT scans, DNA tests and other diagnostics being conducted on several other real mummies in the Vatican have revealed fascinating details about the lives of the person embalmed. One mummy had a small tumour on its scalp, while another that was long believed to be female, turned out to be a man.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/vaticancityandholysee/11361513/Archaeologists-and-experts-say-two-mummies-in-the-Vatican-Museum-are-fakes.html




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MensajeTema: Re: Descubren momias falsas en los museos Vaticanos   Jue Ene 22, 2015 6:03 am

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2920632/Beard-Egypts-King-Tut-hastily-glued-epoxy.html



Burial mask of Tutankhamun is permanently damaged after curators used the wrong kind of glue to reattach its 'beard'
The braided gold beard on Tutankhamun has been permanently damaged
Curator used glue to stick it back on after it was damaged during cleaning
However, museum staff have confirmed it was the wrong type of adhesive
The famous death mask now shows a gap between the face and beard
Dry epoxy on the mask was scraped off, leaving permanent scratch marks

By Corey Charlton for MailOnline


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2920632/Beard-Egypts-King-Tut-hastily-glued-epoxy.html#ixzz3PYi968Qo
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
The blue and gold braided beard on the burial mask of famed pharaoh Tutankhamun was hastily glued back on with the wrong adhesive, damaging the relic after it was knocked during cleaning.

The Egyptian Museum in Cairo, where the burial mask is kept, is one of the city's main tourist sites, but in some areas, ancient wooden sarcophagi lay unprotected from the public, while pharaonic burial shrouds mounted on walls crumble behind open glass cases.

Tutankhamun's mask, over 3,300 years old, and other contents of his tomb are the museum's top exhibits.

Three of the museum's curators reached by telephone gave differing accounts of when the incident occurred last year. They also could not agree whether the beard was knocked off by accident while the mask's case was being cleaned or if was removed because it was loose.

They did agree, however, that orders came from above to fix it quickly and that an inappropriate adhesive was used.

All spoke on condition of anonymity for fear of professional reprisals.

'Unfortunately he used a very irreversible material - epoxy has a very high property for attaching and is used on metal or stone but I think it wasn't suitable for an outstanding object like Tutankhamun's golden mask,' one curator said.

'The mask should have been taken to the conservation lab but they were in a rush to get it displayed quickly again and used this quick drying, irreversible material,' they added.

The curator said that the mask now shows a gap between the face and the beard, whereas before it was directly attached: 'Now you can see a layer of transparent yellow.'

Another museum curator, who was present at the time of the repair, said that epoxy had dried on the face of the boy king's mask and that a colleague used a spatula to remove it, leaving scratches.

The first curator, who inspects the artifact regularly, confirmed the scratches and said it was clear that they had been made by a tool used to scrape off the epoxy.

Egypt's tourist industry, once a pillar of the economy, has yet to recover from three years of tumult following the 2011 uprising that toppled longtime autocrat Hosni Mubarak.

Museums and the opening of new tombs are part of plans to revive the industry.

But authorities have made no significant improvements to the Egyptian Museum since its construction in 1902, and plans to move the Tutankhamun exhibit to its new home in the Grand Egyptian Museum scheduled to open in 2018 have yet to be divulged.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2920632/Beard-Egypts-King-Tut-hastily-glued-epoxy.html#ixzz3PYiJfr6t
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

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