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MensajeTema: KV63   Vie Nov 27, 2015 1:07 am




Otto's Dig Diary

[size=16]11 DECEMBER 2009
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As 2009 is rapidly drawing to a close, we are in process of making the final plans for the season of 2010.    The season will officially get started in early January and run past the middle of March.   There is no more excavation to conduct in KV-63 and during the past season earlier this year, the remaining sealed storage jars were opened and examined. Thus, we can claim that the excavations for KV-63 are complete.  What remains, however, consists of more study and resin removal from the coffins, plus some specialized studies on a variety of the finds.   As we are now in a “study season” mode, we will have a smaller staff.  More details on the coming season will be in the next KV-63 Update which we hope to send out to staff and sponsors before the end of this calendar tear.   The web site will have extracts from the KV-63 Updates which are issued at intervals during the season.


The report (for the Annales du service des Antiquites de l’Egypte) was submitted some time ago and now we await news from the Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA) on our proposal for the renewal of the concession and the supporting security documentation.


The costs of travel, hotels and other needs is considerable, therefore we urge prospective donors to check our DONOR’S PAGE on our web site.  A Paypal link has recently been added to make Domestic and International donations easier. USA Donations are tax-exempt.
     
THE VALLEY OF THE KINGS SINCE HOWARD CARTER SYMPOSIUM

The symposium was hosted by Dr. Zahi Hawass and the Supreme Council of Antiquities  (SCA).  There were several days of activities, but the main events took place on November 4th, the 87th anniversary of Howard Carter’s discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamun (KV-62).


The day’s program was divided into several parts: a series of lectures in the morning was continued in the early evening by many of those archaeologists and Egyptologists who have conducted studies in the KV.  In the middle of the day, the scene shifted to the West Bank of the Nile where there was a luncheon by the old Howard Carter House. The House, in more recent times has been used  by inspectors and now it will become a full-fledged museum honoring Carter’s works in the Valley, the highlight being his discovery of the virtually intact tomb of Tutankhamun (KV-62) in 1922.


Zahi Hawass led off the lecture program in the east bank’s Mummification Museum auditorium with a report on the SCA’s ongoing work in the KV.    In addition to exposing the huts found by Carter in the very center of the Valley, excavations near Merneptah’s KV-8 revealed some ancient trenching for flood control. In the areas investigated, many ostraca and ceramics were found.
      
Geoffrey Martin (Cambridge University) followed with a report on the clearance of Horemheb’s royal tomb (KV-57).  That tomb; as was the case with many monuments, was found by Theodore Davis, but the well chamber and some back rooms had never been fully cleared.  Ostraca found suggest that Horemheb’s reign may have been but only ca. 14 years, not the 27 years sometimes credited to him.
      
I had the honor of following third on the program.  Inasmuch as I have given a number of reports on the recently discovered KV-63, my plan was to summarize how I got involved with the royal valleys, followed by a brief summary of the various tombs associated with my projects in the West Valley (Nos. 23, 24 and 25) and in the main Valley of the Kings  (Nos. 10 and 63).
     
Earl Ertman (Akron University) submitted a title (“Selective Figurative Ostraca from the Area of the Amenmesse Project, Valley of the Kings”), but was unable to attend the conference. Salima Ikram (American University in Cairo) kindly read Earl’s paper.  Salima had the distinction of clearing all of the large storage jars found in KV-63.  She also presented a paper on ”Princes and Pets: Animal Mummies in the Valley of the Kings.”  Among the items illustrated in her presentation was a shrew bundle found in KV-10.

Don Ryan (Pacific Lutheran University) reported on his project that deals with some of the uninscribed tombs in the KV.   In all, there were 15 lecturers scheduled but there were only a few “no shows.”


With the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922, the series of numbered tombs came to standstill until KV-63 was found in 2005.    As many of the conference speaker’s noted, the long list of tombs noted through 1922 did not signify the end of the story.  Most of the work in the royal valleys since 1922 has consisted of a variety of projects from restorations, epigraphic work and tomb clearances--mostly associated with the known monuments.    New techniques and a second (or third) look at the monuments and objects can and still do allow new information to be gained.   The Valley of the Kings reveals its mysteries slowly.  There were 83 years separating the discoveries of KV-62 and KV-63, but it may not take another fourscore years before KV-64 appears. 
 

The luncheon at the Carter House included a tour of the building and a dinner.  Zahi Hawass made an address and the 8th Earl of Carnarvon also made a speech.   The 5th Earl of Carnarvon was Carter’s benefactor; it must be an item of great pride and satisfaction to have this history in one’s family background.
 
OUR SEASON OF 2010

In a short time I will be leaving for Cairo (New Year’s Eve).  I plan to meet with the recently appointed Director of the Permanent Committee and of Foreign Missions, Dr. Mohammed Ismail Khaled on January 3rd, and then hope to reach Luxor by the following morning.    I will then make the necessary arrangements to have KV-10 opened. There will be a Karnak Symposium going on at that time, so I will try to attend some of those lecture’s as I unpack, get settled in the hotel and prepare for the opening of KV-10 and the start of the season’s work.   My hope is that we can get started in the Valley on or about January 7th.
Otto J. Schaden

[size=16]OCTOBER 2009
This summer has been especially busy for the KV-63 staff hence this update is rather substantial. It includes:

Dr. Schaden’s newest Dig Diary

A list of new KV-63 articles and publications (see the Publication tab)

Details on the upcoming Howard Carter Symposium (see Lecture tab)

Information on ‘Tutankhamun: The Latest Discovery in the Valley of the Kings and the Egyptological Art of  Susan Osgood’ (see Exhibit tab)

30 new images…. including some never before seen (under Photos~2009)

and below the Oct. 4th Update…..A Special Commentary on the Menkheperre Seal by Dr. Otto Schaden. A mud seal bearing the cartouche of Menkheperre (Thutmosis III). 

4 OCTOBER 2009
During this past spring and summer, a variety of reports on our work have become available in recent issues of KMT  and our  report on the 2006 season appeared in  ASAE  82 (2008), pp. 231-260.  A report on the 2009 has recently been submitted for publication in ASAE.  A discussion of the discovery of KV-63 will be included in the catalogue for an art show featuring the work of Sue Osgood (cf. below).  Finally, a summary of the last season was also sent to Orientalia.

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With some of the immediate publications now completed, the proposal and security documentation for the 2010 season is the next order of business.  The SCA requires this preliminary paperwork to be submitted several months before the proposed starting work date.  Just a few days ago, a FEDEX packet with the proposal and security papers was sent to Dr. Mohammed Ismael Khaled, recently appointed director of the SCA’s Foreign Missions office.  While the SCA processes our papers, we will work on schedules and budgets. 

 


Funding will be a key item this season. Almost all of the funds at hand are surplus from last season. Our hotel costs were such that we were able to support the large staff and still have some funds remaining.  We will have a much smaller staff in 2010 now that we are fully in a “study season” mode  --- continuing work of the coffins and also some very specialized studies and tasks associated with ceramics, the unbaked clay trays, impressions, samples (for testing) and the like. In our various reports, we have tried to convey the wide range and quantity of the artifacts which were stashed into this small single chambered tomb.

 


Even with a reduced staff, we will have need for a small gang of local workmen led by our reis, Nubi abd el-Basit.  In addition to the foreign staff, we will have need of some SCA conservators.  Our present surplus funds will cover many of our needs, but we issue this call in the hopes of raising some additional funds before the end of this calendar year.  Bill Petty (Museum Tours, Inc. and Petty Foundation) will accept tax-exempt donations; please see our web site’s donation page for details.

 


The SCA will be hosting a conference on “The Valley of the Kings Since Carter” in Luxor during early November of this year.  The meetings are to coincide with the anniversary of Howard Carter’s discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb (KV-62) in 1922.  As my projects have touched of WV-23 (Ay), WV-24, WV-25, KV-10 (Amenmesse) and KV-63, my aim is to present some commentary of the aims and results associated with these tombs.  My presentation will be entitled “The West Valley and Amenmesse Projects (1971-2009).”  Though we cleared WV-23 in 1972, it was in 1971 that I had rubble removed from the entranceway so that its interior could be examined in order to make some reasonable estimates for a possible clearance in the future. Happy to relate that future date materialized quickly.

 


For that SCA conference, Earl Ertman will present a paper entitled “Select Figurative Ostraca from the area of Amenmesse Project, Valley of the Kings.”  Salima Ikram’s lecture will be on “Princes and Pets: Animal Mummies in the Valley of the Kings.”   Salima has examined the animal remains from our projects and has done likewise for other KV missions.

 


84 Years After Tutankhamun: The Latest Discovery in the Valley of the Kings and the Egyptological Art of Susan Osgood” is the title for an art show which will be exhibited in Germany.  Thanks to the generosity of Ray Johnson, director of the Oriental Institute’s Epigraphic Survey, Sue was able to work with our mission in 2006 and 2009, thus her show will feature her work on the KV-63 coffins along with examples of her work with the Chicago House mission.  The show will appear at the Egyptian Museum of the University of Bonn from 26 November through to next June, than it will be shown at The Museum August Kestner in Hanover, Germany from July 15, 2010 until October 2010.  Please see http://www.susanosgood.com/ for additional details or under the KV-63 Exhibit Tab.

 


For the remaining months of 2009, we will concentrate on that KV conference and then on schedules and budget considerations for the 2010 season. As our plans are worked out, we will try to issue at least one more Update after the KV conference is over and we have pretty much worked out schedules for the upcoming 2010 season.

Mudir Otto Schaden





A Special Commentary on the Menkheperre Seal by Dr. Otto Schaden


A mud seal bearing the impression of a cartouche of Menkheperre (Thutmosis III) was found in Pot 3 in March of 2006.
 *A photo of the seal can be found under the 'Photos ~ 2009' tab.


The appearance of a Thutmose III cartouche is, we believe, the result of the use of his famous name on scarabs and seals well beyond his actual period of reign.  Late era kings and the Ptolemies were still adding Thutmosis III's images to the walls of Karnak Temple! 
 
The incomplete seal impression is very intriguing, for it is clearly a cartouche, but the only surviving elements are the sun disc (re) and the beetle (kheper). The text has several likely possibilities for restoration   ---
 
       It could have been [Men]kheper-Re  (Thutmosis III) 
 
       or, [Men]khepr[u-]re   (Thutmosis. IV)
 
       or, [Neb]kheper-Re  (Tut)
 
       or, Kheper-[khepru]re  (Ay)
 


The first two are possible, for we did have a Menkheperre impression in the tomb shaft, and in mixed fill over the East Huts we did have mention of Thutmosis IV on an undated ostracon. The materials in KV-63 could fall into Horemheb's era, but we would expect a djeser sign if Horemheb's name was intended here.
 
Tutankhamun or Ay (see above) would fit best with the ceramics and other materials found in KV-63.   As Tut was followed by Ay, our general dating as "Tut era, give or take a few years" would allow for the restoration of Ay's prenomen here.
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MensajeTema: Re: KV63   Vie Nov 27, 2015 1:07 am

The bottom part of the seal is lost.  The mud can be fragile and may have disintegrated a long time ago.  The shaft, chamber and the storage jars have all been cleared, so there is no chance of finding the missing lower portion of this seal impression.

15 APRIL 2009
KV10/KV-63’s 2009 Season officially ended March 24th. As always…. time proved too short to accomplish all we had planned to get done, but in spite of that the season was quite fruitful.

The final weeks of the season were partially devoted to selecting and packing crates for shipment to the SCA magazine (storage building) near Howard Carter’s House. Five boxes of materials were delivered to the magazine on March 23rd.  On that same morning, the wooden bed was moved to the Mummification Museum for impending display. The following day, March 24th, KV-10 and KV-63 were locked and sealed, signaling the end of the season.  Afterwards, there was some last minute packing to attend to and the post-season report to prepare.  On the evening of March 28th, Archie Chubb and I left for Cairo. The next morning I met with Dr. Magdy el Ghandour, Director of Foreign Missions, to deliver copies of the season report + CD’s and late that morning met with Dr. Zahi Hawass. A few days later I was back home in cold and windy Chicago.

The study of the storage jars was completed during the earlier half of this season which added many extraordinary artifacts to our collection of materials.  Our tally of natron from the jars and coffins surpassed the 400+ kilo mark (over 1,000 lbs.).  The most interesting artifact was the wooden bed, broken into many fragments and stuffed into Jar #13.  In March, the SCA officials decided the bed should go to the Mummification Museum in Luxor.  It was crated and delivered to the museum on March 23rd.  The museum director, Mohammed Yakia Ewada has already put the bed on public display. Meanwhile, Earl Ertman (correction) has prepared a article on KV-63’s Wooden Bed which is slated to appear in the next issue of KMT magazine. Later this summer, a more in-depth article by Roxanne on KV-63 Update: the 2009 Season will appear in the June/July issue of Ancient Egypt magazine.


As mentioned in the last update, Coffin A’s fragments proved to be quite interesting. Though very fragmentary and fragile because of termite damage, some key texts could be recovered from under the resin coating….the title “Royal Nurse” ( mn’t nsw ) and  the name ‘Iny’.  The longest translatable connected text was on the top cross band, left side: ‘Revered, (may) I see Re in the sky and drink water from the pool [ … ].’   Conspicuous by its absence, the deceased is never identified as ‘Osiris’ and the usual deities are not cited.  The one example (quoted above) where we have the usual “revered” there is no qualification such as ‘revered by Anubis’ etc. This lack of the traditional deities strongly suggests that this coffin was probably fashioned during the reign of Akhenaton when many of the traditional deities were abandoned.


The rather high station held by the Royal Nurse Iny is reflected by some of the details of the coffin’s decoration.  Some signs are inlaid, but most of the inlays are now gone.  Some glass is used on the face mask and some border columns (a few still in situ ) have thin (1 mm) blue glass rod inlays.  Finally, some surviving gold leaf further attests to the once opulent condition of this coffin.


Lest we are fortunate to find some other evidence (in 2010) of this Royal Nurse, Iny, we can only speculate as to the specific nature of her position and duties.  As a royal nurse, there are many potential candidates among the Amarna family and their inner circle of confidants. How it came about that her coffin was eventually used as a refuse bin in KV-63 would make a fascinating story.


The general dating of the tomb previously reported still remains valid.  Tomb KV-63 was most likely hewn during the time of Amenophis III.  There is no evidence of a burial but the embalming materials were introduced during several intrusions late in Dynasty XVIII.  This occurred during or very close to the time of Tutankhamun.  Each coffin will be ‘dated’ independently based on style, decoration, texts, i.e. Coffin E is very similar to some coffins from the Amenophis III era, whereas Coffin A shows signs which suggest the Akhenaton era.  More details will be forthcoming on the remaining coffins.


Like many others, Dr. Zahi Hawass asked when we would return to Luxor. It may still be too premature to say for certain, but I anticipate in early 2010.  For now, there are many reports, notebooks, accounts, lectures, and fundraising to do. In addition, to preparing two articles; one for ASAE 82 (2009) and one for the Fall issue of KMT


For the immediate future….the third KV-63 special, Egypt’s Mystery Chamber, is due to air on 26 April on the Discovery’s Science Channel (by Atlantic Productions). The broadcast will focus on the coffin texts, the wooden bed and the opening of some of the storage jars from this season.


Again, thank you for your support and charitable donations ….for even the smallest contribution helps to keep our mission operating each year.



More images and details of the KV-63 Coffins will be coming soon........


Salama.

Mudir Otto Schaden
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MensajeTema: Re: KV63   Vie Nov 27, 2015 1:07 am

5 APRIL 2009
~ Lecture Announcement ~
Sunday, 26 April  at 3:30 P.M.


Egypt’s New Tomb Revealed
Lecture by Dr.Otto Schaden
 
Location: North Shore Retirement Hotel
1611 Chicago Avenue, Evanston, Chicago

Presented by the Chicago Archaeological Society.
Admission is free and open to the public.

19 MARCH 2009
Please note: A large image of the fully restored KV-63 Bed resting on the linen wrapped supports is now featured on our Photos ~ 2009 page. Photo is courtesy of KV-63 staff member Elise van Rooij. Thank you Elise for the wonderful photo and your kind permission to use it on the website! /rw

17 MARCH 2009


Sorry for the delay, for I had intended to have this update out much earlier.
 

My lecture on March 14th at the Mummification Museum went well as I managed to present sixty-eight images in 45 minutes!


As mentioned in my 7 February update we discovered a very unique wooden bed inside Jar #13. In addition to finding the bed in the jar we also found three wooden boards (wrapped in linen) with 4 “prongs” or “legs” which may have served as supports for the bed.  We now have enough such “legs” for four bed supports, but only 3 wrapped boards (ca. 50 cm in length) have been uncovered.
  

During a brief visit to KV-10/KV-63 on March 1st by Dr. Zahi Hawass, he called attention to one of our SCA conservators, Amany Nashed, for her good work on the restoration of the bed.  Dr. Hawass also suggested we try placing the bed on the supports--- which we did the following day and they appear to be a good fit. The KV-63 website already has a few images of the bed and supports posted (*plus some new ones added today) but more images will be made available soon.
  

During the last two months the conservators have been hard at work removing resin off the KV-63 coffins in the hope of finding names and/or titles. In the beginning stages of removing the resin off Coffin E’s lid, it appeared we had the name of a woman, Btau or Butau, a fairly common woman’s name already in the Middle Kingdom and into the New Kingdom. But after further removal of the resin off the box (or base), it became clear that her name is Henut-wadjbu, a common female name from the New Kingdom. Her full description is: “The Osiris, Henut-wadjbu, true of voice.” 


As we are currently copying the texts, we must address the order of the decoration, for traces on the front vertical column do not indicate that Henut-wadjbu’s name was ever present there but it does appear on the cross bands and end panel.   For example, if the coffin was originally decorated for this lady, why are the erasures only on the front column?   Or, if the coffin was initally decorated for Henut-wadjbu, then why weren’t her names erased from the cross bands and end panels?
Furthermore, the vertical column of text down the center of the lid has been thoroughly erased. But on the front of the ‘toe’ section (footboard) one single hieroglyph remains  --- a seated man --- the determinative for a man, indicating that the coffin was at one time inscribed for a male.
A few days ago our conservators began removing resin from the lid fragments of Coffin B and the poorly preserved sides of Coffin A’s box - where we have discovered some very interesting texts!  After further cleaning we will send a report to Dr. Zahi Hawass and later provide more details in our next Update.


In regards to our staff, Conservator Margot Wright has been working on the floral garlands/collars and the beds ”legs”. Artist Sue Osgood (on loan from Chicago House/ORINST) has been drawing Coffins D, G and Coffin B’s mask while Pieter Collet completed the mapping of KV-63 and drew the lion-headed bed. Two recent additions to our team were SCA conservator Adel Aziz Andreus who worked with us in 2006 and SCA Inspector Ahmed Mahmoud Yassin who replaces Inspector Ezzat.


Our season is rapidly drawing to a close, for we had set ca. March 21 for an initial shutdown date but I will allow a few extra days for last minute packing before I head to Cairo and then home. We will try to get in a final update from the field (or from Cairo) towards the end of this month. So stay tuned for more exciting news to come.

Otto Schaden


28 FEBRUARY 2009

A Special Report by Textile Specialist Elise van Rooij (Holland)
 

This season, in addition to examining our tenth pillow (from Jar #13) and a multitude of other textiles from KV-63, I came upon one item of particular interest to report on.

This object appears to be some kind of ‘rug or towel’ found inside Coffin A in 2006. Although this item exhibits significant decomposition enough is salvageable to recognize its original intent and form.
 

It is a ‘pile’ textile, whereby extra strands or loops of thread were woven into the cloth or attached afterwards to project or stick out, to create a pile effect that gave the textile absorbent and isolating qualities (similar to our modern bathroom floor rugs). Other examples of this type of textile were found in the tomb of Kha (laid over a bed) at Deir el Medina, in a eleventh dynasty tomb at Deir el Bahari and in the mass–burial of soldiers in the same area.
 

The actual size of the ‘rug’ is unknown but probably measured at least one square meter judging by the amount of decay and surviving material. A few photos of this remarkable ‘find’ have been made available, under ‘2009 ~ Photos’, courtesy of Elise van Rooij.
 
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Dr. Otto Schaden is scheduled to lecture at the Mummification Museum in Luxor on Saturday, March 14th at 7 P.M. The lecture will include some of the highlights of KV-63’s discoveries this year.

 

NHK Television (Japan Broadcasting Corporation) filmed KV-63 on February 10, 2009 and interviewed Dr. Otto Schaden and Professor Earl Ertman. The network is in the process of filming four separate two-hour television specials – Pyramids, KV-63, Queen Hatshepsut and Cleopatra. The programs are scheduled to air in Japan in September with possible broadcast in the USA by October.
 

On this similar note a new page entitled Media/Television has been added to the KV-63 website. Included in the upcoming broadcasts is a third installment on KV-63 by Atlantic Productions (affiliated in 2006 with Discovery Channel) slated to air later this year. Please check the KV-63 website for further details as dates become available.
 

Also, watch for the upcoming article entitled KV-63’s 2009 Season written by Roxanne Wilson in the June/July 2009 issue of Ancient Egypt, The History, People and Culture of the Nile Valley magazine (UK).
 
The team would also like to acknowledge some of our newly arrived staff members and consultants: Archie Chubb (photographer), Elise van Rooji (Textile Specialist), Maryann Marazzi (Photographer), Margot Wright (Conservator), Pieter Collet (Draftsman), and Sue Osgood (Artist).
 

Update by Roxanne Wilson

[size=16]7 FEBRUARY 2009

The long awaited update featuring descriptions and images of some of our most recent ‘finds’ is finally here.  Many thanks for your patience, as we have been quite busy.
[/size]

In January, as the conservation work began in earnest on the coffins, the KV-63 team also began opening some of the remaining storage jars.  Jar number 13 was the first to be examined and proved to contain some of the most interesting items…. including a wooden bed.  The bed had been broken into many pieces to fit inside the jar, but is now completely restored. The bed features the customary lion head decorations at the head end and the raised footboard on the other; its length is 170 cm.  There are no “feet” to speak of, so it may have been used simply to hold a coffin or mummy “off” the ground during the embalming process.  Some strange boards covered with linen and adorned with possible “feet” were also in Jar 13.  When these items are conserved, we will see if they have any possible connection with the bed as supports.
     
To add to the bedtime theme of the preceding paragraph, we also found an intact pillow (the 10th from KV-63).  Though pushed in at one end from the confined space of the storage jar, it appears to be quite intact and in excellent condition.
     
Among other finds are more miniature vessels, bowls with hieratic texts, linen, jar lids and reed tubes (containing a powdery substance).  One of the jars emptied this season had what must be a whole storage jar within it  --- in many fragments, of course.  A rough estimate is that the tomb and coffins may have contained nearly forty of these large storage jars, all virtually identical to those found by Theodore Davis in KV-54.
    
The new array of natron, natron bags, natron “noodles”, chaff and botanic materials add to the assemblage we collected in 2006.  One new twist consisted of some small bowls tied with strips of cloth and filled with pigments. One is a dark brown powder, another black.   One such bowl is labeled ‘sh3’ which is described as a grain or mineral in the Berlin Dictionary.  We will soon select and package samples in the hopes of submitting them for testing.  
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MensajeTema: Re: KV63   Vie Nov 27, 2015 1:08 am

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MensajeTema: Re: KV63   Lun Feb 08, 2016 12:05 pm

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MensajeTema: Re: KV63   Lun Feb 08, 2016 12:08 pm

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MensajeTema: Re: KV63   Vie Jul 29, 2016 3:26 am

KV63 es una tumba recientemente descubierta en la necrópolis faraónica del Valle de los Reyes en Egipto. Aunque se creyó que era una tumba real, ahora se piensa que es un pozo de embalsamamiento.1

La cámara contenía siete sarcófagos de madera y muchas vasijas grandes de almacenaje. Los ataúdes solo contenían los materiales propios del proceso de momificación, y las vasijas tenían sales, telas de lino y cerámica rota de forma deliberada.

Algunas de los restos de arcilla tienen textos, como parte de un nombre, pa-aten,2 que podría pertenecer al de Anjesenamón, la esposa de Tutankamón.2 Esta inscripción, el estilo arquitectónico de la cámara y la forma de los sarcófagos y las vasijas apuntan a la dinastía XVIII y a la época de Tutankamón, cuya tumba está próxima.
Esta tumba fue descubierta en el año 2000 por el egiptólogo Nicholas Reeves, director de la "Valley of the Kings Foundation" y del proyecto "Amarna Royal Tombs" mediante un estudio geofísico y el uso de sonar; Reeves, sin embargo, fue acusado de estar relacionado con el contrabando de antigüedades, lo que provocó la suspensión temporal de todos los permisos de excavaciones de su equipo. Recientemente una meticulosa investigación ha demostrado su total inocencia y que se trataba de meras calumnias sin fundamento alguno. Sin embargo, durante ese tiempo los permisos para excavar en el lugar le fueron otorgados al equipo del destacado egiptólogo Otto Schaden de la Universidad de Memphis (Tennessee).

Oficialmente, el equipo de Otto Schaden confirmó la existencia de la tumba descubierta por Nicholas Reeves el 10 de marzo de 2005, pero no fue anunciada hasta el 8 de febrero de 2006 por el Consejo Supremo de Antigüedades egipcias, quien acreditó el hallazgo a este equipo de arqueólogos de los Estados Unidos que actúa desde hace años en el Valle de los Reyes bajo la dirección de Otto Schaden. El equipo acordó catalogar la tumba con el nombre "KV63", de acuerdo a la convencional enumeración secuencial usada en el Valle de los Reyes. KV63 es la primera tumba descubierta intacta en este valle desde el descubrimiento de KV62, la tumba de Tutankamón, por Howard Carter en 1922.

El 26 de mayo de 2006, un pequeño sarcófago de 42 cm recubierto de pan de oro fue encontrado en el interior de un ataúd mediano, bajo las almohadas.
KV63 está localizada en una pequeña área situada entre KV10 y KV62, en el centro de la rama oriental del Valle de los Reyes, y bastante cercana a la encrucijada principal de la red de caminos.


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MensajeTema: Re: KV63   Vie Jul 29, 2016 3:26 am

El descubrimiento fue hecho cuando el equipo arqueológico realizaba excavaciones de algunas chozas de los trabajadores de la dinastía XIX frente a la entrada de la tumba KV10. En la exploración se detectó una capa de roca oscura, y al cavar se encontraron unas lajas de piedra blanca. Una exploración posterior reveló el borde de una piedra tallada o cortada artificialmente, que resultó ser el extremo superior de un pasaje vertical. En aquel momento el equipo sabía que habían descubierto algo mucho más complejo y significativo que las casas de reposo de los trabajadores de las tumbas. Lamentablemente, el descubrimiento de esta pista importante se produjo al final de la campaña de excavaciones 2004-05, por lo que tuvieron que ser pospuestas las excavaciones hasta que el equipo reanudó su trabajo en el otoño siguiente.

El pasaje encontrado desciende aproximadamente cinco metros. En el fondo de este túnel se halla una puerta de un metro y medio de altura, sellada con bloques de piedra. Detrás de esta puerta, en la cual el equipo abrió una pequeña hueco, hacia el 8 de febrero se descubre la única cámara funeraria en forma de "L" con varios ataúdes de madera y un número indeterminado de grandes jarras. No se encontró ningún sello en la puerta, lo que permitió considerar que KV63 ya había sufrido alguna intrusión en la antigüedad.

El plano de KV63 es similar al de otras dos tumbas de la dinastía XVIII, las de Yuya y Tuyu, de tal modo que puede fecharse la construcción circa del siglo XIV a. C., especulándose sobre si las tres tumbas son obra del mismo arquitecto.4 Los destinatarios no han sido aún identificados, pero el equipo está seguro de que son individuos de la nobleza o bien relacionados con las clases altas; Zahi Hawass cree que podrían ser miembros de la familia real.

La cámara funeraria mide aproximadamente cuatro metros por cinco y, por lo que puede ser visto, tiene paredes blancas claras anepígrafas (sin jeroglíficos). Contiene siete ataúdes de madera: cinco de adultos, uno de niño o adolescente, y otro de bebé. Los tres adultos y el niño tienen máscaras funerarias de color amarillo, estilo característico de finales de la dinastía XVIII; los otros dos adultos tienen máscaras funerarias negras, más parecidas al estilo temprano de la misma dinastía. Los detalles del ataúd clasificado como de bebé son aún confusos. Se cree que los ataúdes que tienen máscaras funerarias amarillas son femeninos. Se observan graves daños causados por las termitas en algunos de ellos, sin embargo otros parecen intactos. Parte de los daños podrían haber sido causados por la acción de antiguos ladrones de tumbas, y no se ha hallado ninguna señal de daños causados por agua.

La tumba conserva 28 jarras grandes (según la última información), aproximadamente de 70 cm de alto, algunas de cerámica y otras de alabastro. Una jarra pesa unos cuarenta kilogramos (90-95 libras). Otras tres jarras parecen haber estado rotas ya desde la antigüedad en el borde o cuello inferior. La mayor parte tienen tapas selladas intactas, pero no parecen tener ningún sello faraónico y sus contenidos están aún pendientes de examen y de una investigación profunda.

El trabajo continuó con la extracción cuidadosa de los ataúdes y las jarras y su traslado a la tumba KV10, que presenta un espacio ideal para que la conservación, el examen y el análisis de los ataúdes y jarras se haga de una manera apropiada y científica. Se ideó un sistema de poleas para facilitar el retiro seguro del material: se utilizaron macetas para levantar las jarras desde el lugar donde éstas fueron embaladas hace 3000 años. Un gran ostracon se rompió al forzar la entrada a la tumba, pero por suerte la ruptura fue limpia (solamente dos pedazos) y podrá ser fácilmente restaurado.

Al mostrarse las primeras fotografías, el egiptólogo Kent Weeks del Theban Mapping Project –no implicado en el descubrimiento pero contratado en la excavación en curso de la cercana KV5– ha afirmado que no cree que la nueva tumba fuera destinada a ningún faraón; piensa que es más probable que podría ser para alguna esposa o hijo de un rey, o incluso para algún funcionario o sacerdote.

Sin embargo, más recientemente, Otto Schaden declaró que la elegante artesanía de la tumba y la calidad de la decoración de los ataúdes conduce al equipo a creer que se trate de un posible entierro real, aunque es factible que el sepulcro pudiera haber sido destinado a miembros de la familia real o a funcionarios reales vinculados con la administración de algún faraón. Hasta el momento no se han descubierto nombres, títulos o inscripciones de ningún tipo en los ataúdes. Aunque se llama el Valle de los Reyes, no todas las tumbas se atribuyen a faraones pues algunas son de funcionarios, reinas, o incluso de cortesanos.

Referencias[editar]

1.Volver arriba ↑ El hallazgo es una cámara de momificación, no una tumba. Discovery Channel
2.↑ Saltar a: a b "Egypt's New Tomb Revealed," Discovery Channel, USA, broadcast 4 June 2006.
3.Volver arriba ↑ [http://web.archive.org/web/http://www.egyptologyforum.org/bbs/KV63J.html fotografías
4.Volver arriba ↑ Mark Rose, "KV 63: A Look at the New Tomb revista Archaeology May 1, 2006.

Enlaces externos[editar]
KV63 (Página oficial de la expedición de Otto Schaden) (en inglés)
Nueva tumba descubierta en el Valle de los reyes (Sitio oficial de la Universidad de Memphis) (en inglés)
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MensajeTema: Re: KV63   Vie Jul 29, 2016 3:27 am

Otto's Dig Diary

11 DECEMBER 2009


As 2009 is rapidly drawing to a close, we are in process of making the final plans for the season of 2010. The season will officially get started in early January and run past the middle of March. There is no more excavation to conduct in KV-63 and during the past season earlier this year, the remaining sealed storage jars were opened and examined. Thus, we can claim that the excavations for KV-63 are complete. What remains, however, consists of more study and resin removal from the coffins, plus some specialized studies on a variety of the finds. As we are now in a “study season” mode, we will have a smaller staff. More details on the coming season will be in the next KV-63 Update which we hope to send out to staff and sponsors before the end of this calendar tear. The web site will have extracts from the KV-63 Updates which are issued at intervals during the season.



The report (for the Annales du service des Antiquites de l’Egypte) was submitted some time ago and now we await news from the Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA) on our proposal for the renewal of the concession and the supporting security documentation.



The costs of travel, hotels and other needs is considerable, therefore we urge prospective donors to check our DONOR’S PAGE on our web site. A Paypal link has recently been added to make Domestic and International donations easier. USA Donations are tax-exempt.

THE VALLEY OF THE KINGS SINCE HOWARD CARTER SYMPOSIUM

The symposium was hosted by Dr. Zahi Hawass and the Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA). There were several days of activities, but the main events took place on November 4th, the 87th anniversary of Howard Carter’s discovery of the tomb of Tutankhamun (KV-62).



The day’s program was divided into several parts: a series of lectures in the morning was continued in the early evening by many of those archaeologists and Egyptologists who have conducted studies in the KV. In the middle of the day, the scene shifted to the West Bank of the Nile where there was a luncheon by the old Howard Carter House. The House, in more recent times has been used by inspectors and now it will become a full-fledged museum honoring Carter’s works in the Valley, the highlight being his discovery of the virtually intact tomb of Tutankhamun (KV-62) in 1922.



Zahi Hawass led off the lecture program in the east bank’s Mummification Museum auditorium with a report on the SCA’s ongoing work in the KV. In addition to exposing the huts found by Carter in the very center of the Valley, excavations near Merneptah’s KV-8 revealed some ancient trenching for flood control. In the areas investigated, many ostraca and ceramics were found.

Geoffrey Martin (Cambridge University) followed with a report on the clearance of Horemheb’s royal tomb (KV-57). That tomb; as was the case with many monuments, was found by Theodore Davis, but the well chamber and some back rooms had never been fully cleared. Ostraca found suggest that Horemheb’s reign may have been but only ca. 14 years, not the 27 years sometimes credited to him.

I had the honor of following third on the program. Inasmuch as I have given a number of reports on the recently discovered KV-63, my plan was to summarize how I got involved with the royal valleys, followed by a brief summary of the various tombs associated with my projects in the West Valley (Nos. 23, 24 and 25) and in the main Valley of the Kings (Nos. 10 and 63).

Earl Ertman (Akron University) submitted a title (“Selective Figurative Ostraca from the Area of the Amenmesse Project, Valley of the Kings”), but was unable to attend the conference. Salima Ikram (American University in Cairo) kindly read Earl’s paper. Salima had the distinction of clearing all of the large storage jars found in KV-63. She also presented a paper on ”Princes and Pets: Animal Mummies in the Valley of the Kings.” Among the items illustrated in her presentation was a shrew bundle found in KV-10.

Don Ryan (Pacific Lutheran University) reported on his project that deals with some of the uninscribed tombs in the KV. In all, there were 15 lecturers scheduled but there were only a few “no shows.”



With the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922, the series of numbered tombs came to standstill until KV-63 was found in 2005. As many of the conference speaker’s noted, the long list of tombs noted through 1922 did not signify the end of the story. Most of the work in the royal valleys since 1922 has consisted of a variety of projects from restorations, epigraphic work and tomb clearances--mostly associated with the known monuments. New techniques and a second (or third) look at the monuments and objects can and still do allow new information to be gained. The Valley of the Kings reveals its mysteries slowly. There were 83 years separating the discoveries of KV-62 and KV-63, but it may not take another fourscore years before KV-64 appears.


The luncheon at the Carter House included a tour of the building and a dinner. Zahi Hawass made an address and the 8th Earl of Carnarvon also made a speech. The 5th Earl of Carnarvon was Carter’s benefactor; it must be an item of great pride and satisfaction to have this history in one’s family background.

OUR SEASON OF 2010

In a short time I will be leaving for Cairo (New Year’s Eve). I plan to meet with the recently appointed Director of the Permanent Committee and of Foreign Missions, Dr. Mohammed Ismail Khaled on January 3rd, and then hope to reach Luxor by the following morning. I will then make the necessary arrangements to have KV-10 opened. There will be a Karnak Symposium going on at that time, so I will try to attend some of those lecture’s as I unpack, get settled in the hotel and prepare for the opening of KV-10 and the start of the season’s work. My hope is that we can get started in the Valley on or about January 7th.

Otto J. Schaden

OCTOBER 2009
This summer has been especially busy for the KV-63 staff hence this update is rather substantial. It includes:

Dr. Schaden’s newest Dig Diary

A list of new KV-63 articles and publications (see the Publication tab)

Details on the upcoming Howard Carter Symposium (see Lecture tab)

Information on ‘Tutankhamun: The Latest Discovery in the Valley of the Kings and the Egyptological Art of Susan Osgood’ (see Exhibit tab)

30 new images…. including some never before seen (under Photos~2009)

and below the Oct. 4th Update…..A Special Commentary on the Menkheperre Seal by Dr. Otto Schaden. A mud seal bearing the cartouche of Menkheperre (Thutmosis III).

4 OCTOBER 2009
During this past spring and summer, a variety of reports on our work have become available in recent issues of KMT and our report on the 2006 season appeared in ASAE 82 (2008), pp. 231-260. A report on the 2009 has recently been submitted for publication in ASAE. A discussion of the discovery of KV-63 will be included in the catalogue for an art show featuring the work of Sue Osgood (cf. below). Finally, a summary of the last season was also sent to Orientalia.


With some of the immediate publications now completed, the proposal and security documentation for the 2010 season is the next order of business. The SCA requires this preliminary paperwork to be submitted several months before the proposed starting work date. Just a few days ago, a FEDEX packet with the proposal and security papers was sent to Dr. Mohammed Ismael Khaled, recently appointed director of the SCA’s Foreign Missions office. While the SCA processes our papers, we will work on schedules and budgets.


Funding will be a key item this season. Almost all of the funds at hand are surplus from last season. Our hotel costs were such that we were able to support the large staff and still have some funds remaining. We will have a much smaller staff in 2010 now that we are fully in a “study season” mode --- continuing work of the coffins and also some very specialized studies and tasks associated with ceramics, the unbaked clay trays, impressions, samples (for testing) and the like. In our various reports, we have tried to convey the wide range and quantity of the artifacts which were stashed into this small single chambered tomb.


Even with a reduced staff, we will have need for a small gang of local workmen led by our reis, Nubi abd el-Basit. In addition to the foreign staff, we will have need of some SCA conservators. Our present surplus funds will cover many of our needs, but we issue this call in the hopes of raising some additional funds before the end of this calendar year. Bill Petty (Museum Tours, Inc. and Petty Foundation) will accept tax-exempt donations; please see our web site’s donation page for details.


The SCA will be hosting a conference on “The Valley of the Kings Since Carter” in Luxor during early November of this year. The meetings are to coincide with the anniversary of Howard Carter’s discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb (KV-62) in 1922. As my projects have touched of WV-23 (Ay), WV-24, WV-25, KV-10 (Amenmesse) and KV-63, my aim is to present some commentary of the aims and results associated with these tombs. My presentation will be entitled “The West Valley and Amenmesse Projects (1971-2009).” Though we cleared WV-23 in 1972, it was in 1971 that I had rubble removed from the entranceway so that its interior could be examined in order to make some reasonable estimates for a possible clearance in the future. Happy to relate that future date materialized quickly.


For that SCA conference, Earl Ertman will present a paper entitled “Select Figurative Ostraca from the area of Amenmesse Project, Valley of the Kings.” Salima Ikram’s lecture will be on “Princes and Pets: Animal Mummies in the Valley of the Kings.” Salima has examined the animal remains from our projects and has done likewise for other KV missions.


“84 Years After Tutankhamun: The Latest Discovery in the Valley of the Kings and the Egyptological Art of Susan Osgood” is the title for an art show which will be exhibited in Germany. Thanks to the generosity of Ray Johnson, director of the Oriental Institute’s Epigraphic Survey, Sue was able to work with our mission in 2006 and 2009, thus her show will feature her work on the KV-63 coffins along with examples of her work with the Chicago House mission. The show will appear at the Egyptian Museum of the University of Bonn from 26 November through to next June, than it will be shown at The Museum August Kestner in Hanover, Germany from July 15, 2010 until October 2010. Please see http://www.susanosgood.com/ for additional details or under the KV-63 Exhibit Tab.


For the remaining months of 2009, we will concentrate on that KV conference and then on schedules and budget considerations for the 2010 season. As our plans are worked out, we will try to issue at least one more Update after the KV conference is over and we have pretty much worked out schedules for the upcoming 2010 season.
Mudir Otto Schaden


A Special Commentary on the Menkheperre Seal by Dr. Otto Schaden

A mud seal bearing the impression of a cartouche of Menkheperre (Thutmosis III) was found in Pot 3 in March of 2006. *A photo of the seal can be found under the 'Photos ~ 2009' tab.

The appearance of a Thutmose III cartouche is, we believe, the result of the use of his famous name on scarabs and seals well beyond his actual period of reign. Late era kings and the Ptolemies were still adding Thutmosis III's images to the walls of Karnak Temple!

The incomplete seal impression is very intriguing, for it is clearly a cartouche, but the only surviving elements are the sun disc (re) and the beetle (kheper). The text has several likely possibilities for restoration ---

It could have been [Men]kheper-Re (Thutmosis III)

or, [Men]khepr[u-]re (Thutmosis. IV)

or, [Neb]kheper-Re (Tut)

or, Kheper-[khepru]re (Ay)


The first two are possible, for we did have a Menkheperre impression in the tomb shaft, and in mixed fill over the East Huts we did have mention of Thutmosis IV on an undated ostracon. The materials in KV-63 could fall into Horemheb's era, but we would expect a djeser sign if Horemheb's name was intended here.

Tutankhamun or Ay (see above) would fit best with the ceramics and other materials found in KV-63. As Tut was followed by Ay, our general dating as "Tut era, give or take a few years" would allow for the restoration of Ay's prenomen here.

The bottom part of the seal is lost. The mud can be fragile and may have disintegrated a long time ago. The shaft, chamber and the storage jars have all been cleared, so there is no chance of finding the missing lower portion of this seal impression.

http://www.kv-63.com/index.html

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Esta foto de Luxor es cortesía de TripAdvisor
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