egiptomaníacos2007

Historia del Egipto Faraónico
 
ÍndicePortalFAQBuscarRegistrarseMiembrosGrupos de UsuariosConectarse

Comparte | 
 

 Met Museum

Ir abajo 
AutorMensaje
Semíramis
Admin
avatar

Cantidad de envíos : 53654
Localisation : KV 43
Fecha de inscripción : 10/06/2007

MensajeTema: Met Museum   Lun Nov 21, 2016 12:14 am




Ramesses III and Prince Amenherkhepeshef before Hathor

Artist:Nina de Garis Davies (1881–1965)
Period:New Kingdom, RamessideDynasty:Dynasty 20Reign:reign of Ramesses IIIDate:Original ca. 1184–1153 B.C.Geography:Original from Egypt, Upper Egypt, Thebes, Valley of the Queens, Tomb of Amenherkhepeshef (QV 55), MMA graphic expedition 1933Medium:Paper, tempera paint, inkDimensions:facsimile: h. 94.5 cm (37 3/16 in); w. 64.5 cm (25 3/8 in) scale about 2:5 framed: h. 87.3 cm (34 3/8 in); w. 67.3 cm (26 1/2 in)

http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/548357
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario http://nieblaysombras.blogspot.com/
Maat

avatar

Cantidad de envíos : 15306
Fecha de inscripción : 17/06/2007

MensajeTema: Re: Met Museum   Jue Dic 01, 2016 11:21 pm

gracias
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
Semíramis
Admin
avatar

Cantidad de envíos : 53654
Localisation : KV 43
Fecha de inscripción : 10/06/2007

MensajeTema: Re: Met Museum   Vie Dic 09, 2016 3:47 am




Stela

Period:Third Intermediate PeriodDynasty:Dynasty 22Date:ca. 945–715 B.C.Geography:From Egypt, Upper Egypt, Thebes, Asasif, Tomb MMA 825, MMA excavations, 1929–30Medium:PotteryDimensions:H. 15.5 cm (6 1/8 in); w. 9 cm (3 9/16 in)Credit Line:Rogers Fund, 1931Accession Number:31.3.110

Three votive beds (31.3.108, 31.3.109 and a third in Cairo) and a small stela (31.3.110) were excavated in MMA tomb 825 at Deir el Bahri. These are very well-preserved examples of a type of object that appeared only in Thebes between the 22nd and 26th Dynasties. A number of recent studies of the type and of MMA 31.3.108 in particular have revealed much about their significance and about their many interesting implications for understanding non-temple religious practices and artistic provision for the same.
The decoration of these objects includes frontal standing nude females in boats with figureheads like sacred barks, Bes figures, and particular vegetation; some other examples include a kneeling female playing a lute. The decoration carries with it significations for female fertility, conception, and birth. However, it also seems likely that votive beds are associated with the Egyptian New Year festival, and the myth of the return of the absent goddess and the flood. This is indicated, for example, by the crown worn by the female figure, which is one usually worn by Anukis, a goddess linked to the return of the flood. The origin of the particular bed-form and the use of the objects are hardly clear, but based on analysis of find spots it has been suggested that the objects are associated with the coterie of temple women around the god Amun and the God’s Wives.

http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/550813…
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario http://nieblaysombras.blogspot.com/
Semíramis
Admin
avatar

Cantidad de envíos : 53654
Localisation : KV 43
Fecha de inscripción : 10/06/2007

MensajeTema: Re: Met Museum   Dom Dic 11, 2016 12:30 am





Magical Stela (Cippus of Horus)




Period:Late PeriodDynasty:Dynasty 30Reign:reign of Nectanebo IIDate:360–343 B.C.Geography:From Egypt, Alexandria Region, Alexandria; Probably originally from Memphite Region, Heliopolis (Iunu; On), Temple of the Mnevis bullsMedium:Meta-GreywackeDimensions:Overall h. 83.5 cm (32 7/8 in); w. 33.5 cm (13 3/16 in); d. 7.2 cm (2 13/16 in); h. of base 14.4 cm( 5 11/16 in); 33.5 cm (13 3/16 in); d. 14.4 cm (5 11/16 in)Credit Line:Fletcher Fund, 1950Accession Number:50.85







The top half of this stela was skillfully carved in the hard dark stone. On the part below the central figure panel, rows of hieroglyphs record thirteen magic spells to protect against poisonous bites and wounds and to cure the illnesses caused by them. The stela was commissioned by the priest Esatum to be set up in the public part of a temple. A victim could recite or drink water that had been poured over the magic words and images on the stela. As a mythic precedent, the hieroglyphic inscription around the base describes the magic cure that was worked upon the infant Horus by Thoth, the god of wisdom and writing.




On the stela Isis speaks and recounts that while she and Horus were still hiding in the marshes, the child became ill. In her despair, she cried for help to the "Boat of Eternity" (the sun boat in which the god travels over the sky), "and the sun disk stopped opposite her and did not move from his place." Thoth was sent from the sun boat to help Isis and cured Horus by reciting a catalogue of spells. The spells always ended with the phrase "and the protection of the afflicted as well," indicating that by using these spells, any type of affliction in human beings would be healed.




In this detail of the stela, Horus emerges from the background in such high relief that he is posed as an actual three-dimensional statue, with his left leg striding forward and his head directly facing the viewer. He is portrayed in the conventional Egyptian form for youth; that is, he is nude and wearing his hair in a side lock. The soft, rounded forms of the bodies of Horus and the other deities are typical of the style of the period.




To symbolize his magic powers, Horus holds snakes and scorpions as well as an antelope (by its horns) and a lion (by its tail) in his closed fists. His feet rest on two crocodiles. Above him is the head of Bes, the dwarf deity with leonine features who had traditionally protected households but by this time had become a more general protective deity. Horus is flanked by three deities who stand upon coiled snakes. On the right is Thoth, identified by his ibis head, and on the left is Isis. Both protectively hold the walls of a curved reed hut, a primeval chapel, in which the Horus child stands together with a figure of Re-harakhty, god of the rising sun, and two standards in the form of papyrus and lotus columns. The lotus standard supports the two feathers of Osiris's headdress.




The images incised into the stone at the top of the stela portray the perilous nighttime journey of the sun as it passes through the nether world under the earth. Its rebirth each morning is shown at the uppermost point of the stela, where Thoth, four baboons, and the kneeling King Nectanebo II lift their arms in the gesture of adoration and prayer. Nectanebo II was the last indigenous king of ancient Egypt. He struggled valiantly against the Persian empire only to be defeated in the end. After the lost battle, he fled to Upper Egypt, and nothing is known about his end.







http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/546037

Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario http://nieblaysombras.blogspot.com/
Semíramis
Admin
avatar

Cantidad de envíos : 53654
Localisation : KV 43
Fecha de inscripción : 10/06/2007

MensajeTema: Re: Met Museum   Vie Dic 16, 2016 12:03 am



Djed pillar Amulet
Period:Late Period–Ptolemaic PeriodDynasty:Dynasty 26–29Date:664–30 B.C.Geography:From EgyptMedium:FaienceDimensions:H. 4.5cm (1 3/4 in); w. 1.7cm (11/16 in); th. 0.9cm (3/8 in)
This emblem of Osiris, god of the underworld, was a potent symbol of regeneration and therefore made to accompany the mummy on its journey. What the form represents is unknown: a leafless tree or a pole with notches or attachments. Eventually it came to represent the backbone of Osiris and in the New Kingdom decorated the bases of coffins.
http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/548359
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario http://nieblaysombras.blogspot.com/
Semíramis
Admin
avatar

Cantidad de envíos : 53654
Localisation : KV 43
Fecha de inscripción : 10/06/2007

MensajeTema: Re: Met Museum   Vie Dic 16, 2016 12:08 am



Djed pillar




Period:Late Period–Ptolemaic PeriodDate:525–30 BCGeography:From EgyptMedium:Yellow GlassDimensions:H. 3.4 × W. 1.3 cm (1 5/16 × 1/2 in.)Credit Line:Gift of J. Pierpont Morgan, 1917




Starting in the later Late Period and continuing through the Ptolemaic Period, glass a type of glass amulet cast by pressing the glass into a shallow open mold appears. The back was left rough, and the amulets may look ragged because glass overflowed the mold around the edges. The earlier amulets are monochrome, bi- or multicolor amulets supplement the repertoire during the Ptolemaic Period.




Some of the amulets can be specifically tied to spells of the Book of the Dead – for example, acc. no. 17.194.2526 – and most are clearly funerary amulets, presumably meant to be wrapped between the bandages of the mummy where the presence of the amulet would do its job irrespective of its degree of finish.




http://metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/559435


Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario http://nieblaysombras.blogspot.com/
Semíramis
Admin
avatar

Cantidad de envíos : 53654
Localisation : KV 43
Fecha de inscripción : 10/06/2007

MensajeTema: Re: Met Museum   Dom Ene 15, 2017 11:45 pm

Statue of Hatshepsut on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art


Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario http://nieblaysombras.blogspot.com/
Semíramis
Admin
avatar

Cantidad de envíos : 53654
Localisation : KV 43
Fecha de inscripción : 10/06/2007

MensajeTema: Re: Met Museum   Dom Ene 15, 2017 11:52 pm



Closeup shot of a large granite sphinx bearing the likeness of the female pharaoh Hatshepsut. Dating to the joint reign of Hatshepsut and Thutmose III, circa 1479-1458 B.C.

Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario http://nieblaysombras.blogspot.com/
Semíramis
Admin
avatar

Cantidad de envíos : 53654
Localisation : KV 43
Fecha de inscripción : 10/06/2007

MensajeTema: Re: Met Museum   Jue Ene 26, 2017 8:34 am



Mastaba Tomb of Perneb

Period:Old KingdomDynasty:Dynasty 5Reign:reigns of Isesi to UnisDate:ca. 2381–2323 B.C.Geography:From Egypt, Memphite Region, Saqqara, Tomb of Perneb, Egyptian Antiquities Service/Quibell excavationsMedium:Limestone, paintDimensions:H. 482.2 cm (15 ft. 9 13/16 in.)
The Location of Perneb’s Tomb

For millennia, the vast cemetery of Saqqara (about twenty-five miles south of Cairo) was the burial ground for Memphis, ancient Egypt’s capital. In an especially crowded section, just north of the enclosure around King Djoser’s Step Pyramid at Saqqara (built during Dynasty 3, ca. 2650 B.C.), a number of courtiers and royal family members of Dynasty 5 (ca. 2465–2323 B.C.) were buried. Among them were Perneb and the vizier Shepsesre, who may have been Perneb’s father.
Perneb’s Tomb: A Mastaba

In many societies graves are covered with mounds of earth and stone. By the beginning of Dynasty 1 (ca. 3100 B.C.) the ancient Egyptians had transformed that simple scheme into a formalized building type that Egyptologists call a mastaba (from the Arabic word for "bench"). The typical mastaba of Perneb’s time was built of stone or brick. Its shape was rectangular, and its height roughly that of a one-story modern house. The roof was flat; the sides were inclined and most often unadorned except for some architectural articulation around the doorway and an occasional inscription along the top and corners. To serve the needs of larger communities, great numbers of mastabas were arranged in rows, forming veritable "cities of the dead."

Perneb’s Tomb Built Against the Tomb of Shepsesre

The builders of Perneb’s mastaba took advantage of the earlier large tomb of the vizier Shepsesre. By leaning the two projecting wings of Perneb’s tomb superstructure against the strong west wall of Shepsesre’s tomb, they gained not only structural stability but also space for an interior courtyard. In order to present the architecture of Perneb’s tomb in a manner as close as possible to that of the original, the present installation includes a partial reconstruction of the west wall of the Shepsesre tomb. The limestone blocks used in this reconstruction come from Helwan, south of Cairo, a quarry near the ancient source of Perneb’s building material. The stepped face of the reconstructed wall inside the courtyard reproduces the appearance of the original. Its center is shown, however, in ruined condition, so that visitors entering from the Museum’s Great Hall can glimpse the courtyard and interior façade of Perneb’s monument.

The Interior Rooms of Perneb’s Mastaba and the Burial

Up to and through Dynasty 4, most of the interior space of a mastaba was packed with rubble, and only a few rooms, if any, were built within the compact mass. The number of rooms increased during Dynasties 5 and 6, especially for persons of high status, but the basic concept of a compact rectangle of stone or brick was never quite abandoned. Within Perneb’s mastaba four rooms were prepared: an entrance passage in the center (originally the west wall), a vestibule, an inner passage connecting the vestibule with the offering chamber, and the main offering chamber. In addition, there are an entrance chamber in the right (originally north) wing and an offering chamber in the left (originally south) wing. The latter is connected to the statue chamber (or serdab) by a small slot in the wall.

Also in each mastaba at least one shaft was sunk vertically through the rubble fill to reach the burial chamber in the bedrock below. After deposition of the mummy and its accompanying burial equipment, the shaft was filled in. (Perneb’s shaft and burial are not preserved here.) But the rooms in the superstructure remained accessible to relatives and friends of the deceased who visited the tomb to make offerings and perform rituals.

The Tomb as a House

With the addition of the reconstructed wall, Museum visitors can experience the tomb much as ancient Egyptians did. As originally, one passes through a small entrance chamber into an interior courtyard, which was open to the sky but closed on all four sides.

Ancient visitors would have felt very much at home in this intimate space; many of its architectural elements were familiar from the homes they lived in. Entry into their houses was through just such a small doorway, and in the privacy of the courtyard women would attend to the laundry or cook a meal. The recessed central doorway overlooking the courtyard indicated the entry into the interior of the house, where the master awaited his guests.

The Tomb as a Sacred Place

A tomb, however, is not just a house for the dead. It is a sacred place dedicated to the belief in life after death. This aspect was emphasized in Perneb’s tomb by two small obelisks (now missing) at the western corners of the courtyard. They evoked the presence of the sun god Re who, especially in Perneb’s time, was venerated as the ultimate source of life in grandiose solar temples built around huge obelisks. Most importantly, the interior rooms of the mastaba were places for the performance of life-renewing rituals. Eternalized in the wall decorations, these rituals and the offerings that accompanied them provided the deceased with everlasting sustenance. The statues in the serdab represented the tomb owner as a living person who could receive the potent life forces activated through the chants and incense burning that took place in the south offering chamber.
http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/543937

Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario http://nieblaysombras.blogspot.com/
Semíramis
Admin
avatar

Cantidad de envíos : 53654
Localisation : KV 43
Fecha de inscripción : 10/06/2007

MensajeTema: Re: Met Museum   Mar Ene 31, 2017 2:47 am



http://www.metmuseum.org/
Amon
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario http://nieblaysombras.blogspot.com/
Semíramis
Admin
avatar

Cantidad de envíos : 53654
Localisation : KV 43
Fecha de inscripción : 10/06/2007

MensajeTema: Re: Met Museum   Lun Feb 06, 2017 10:39 pm

Coffin of Ahmose
Period:New KingdomDynasty:early Dynasty 18Reign:reign of Ahmose I to HatshepsutDate:ca. 1550–1458 B.C.Geography:From Egypt, Upper Egypt, Thebes, Asasif, probably Tomb CC 64, burial 9, Carnarvon Excavations 1907–1914Medium:Sycomore wood, stucco, paint Dimensions:L. 229 cm (90 3/16 in); h. 60 cm (23 5/8 in)
The rishi coffin of the Second Intermediate Period (see for example 30.3.4a, b) gave way in the early New Kingdom to the type seen here, an anthropoid coffin made of large planks, coated with stucco and painted white. Two long vertical bands run down the center of the lid, and transverse bands wrap around lid and trough. These bands represent the tapes that bound the outer layers of linen wrappings around the body, identifying the coffin with the mummy and thus as an additional repository for the intangible aspects of the person thought to survive death. The bands are also thought to echo the architectural features seen on earlier rectangular coffins (see 32.3.429a, b) that characterize the coffin as the eternal dwelling place of the deceased.
This coffin was inscribed for Ahmose, son of the Lady of the House, Nakht. Strapped to his chin is the long, curved beard of divinity, around his shoulders is a broad collar with falcon-head terminals, and on his chest is a winged vulture. The amuletic wedjat eyes seen on earlier coffins are translated here into single large eyes in panels on either side of the box. On the sides of the coffin are the members of Ahmose's family, here to pay their eternal respects. To the right his wife Hapu and daughter, also named Ahmose, raise their arms in gestures of mourning; behind the women are two sons, Djehuty and Mekyniwetef. Hapu appears again to the left, this time with a different daughter, Tet, and two sons, Nebseny and Siamun. On the foot end are figures of the goddesses Isis and Nephthys, along with a male offering bearer. The long bands on the lid are also used to carry offering prayers for the benefit of Ahmose: one calls on the mortuary god Osiris, like many such prayers; the other is more unusual in that it invokes the great state god of the New Kingdom, Amun-Re.
http://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/543865


Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario http://nieblaysombras.blogspot.com/
Maat

avatar

Cantidad de envíos : 15306
Fecha de inscripción : 17/06/2007

MensajeTema: Re: Met Museum   Lun Abr 30, 2018 12:07 am

gracias
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
Contenido patrocinado




MensajeTema: Re: Met Museum   

Volver arriba Ir abajo
 
Met Museum
Volver arriba 
Página 1 de 1.
 Temas similares
-
» Exibicion arqueológica en el Columbia Museum of Art
» British Museum
» Rare artefacts transported to the Grand Egyptian Museum unde
» Caryatid Statues, Restored, Are Stars at Athens Museum
» British Museum :descarga de pdf´s

Permisos de este foro:No puedes responder a temas en este foro.
egiptomaníacos2007 :: 

HISTORIA DEL EGIPTO FARAÓNICO

 :: Museos del Mundo
-
Cambiar a: