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 Daños y destrozos en antigüedades

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Ramses User Maat Ra



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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Jue Feb 03, 2011 3:36 am

Gracias por el enlace serezhade, todo esto es terrible, poco que añadir creo que el sentimiento que siento es similar al tuyo, desde hace dias una parte de mi no esta aquí.

Gracias a todas/os por las noticias aportadas a este tema!

Saludos
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Hathor3



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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Jue Feb 03, 2011 3:47 am

Shocked gracias por la página web!!
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Raul



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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Jue Feb 03, 2011 4:39 am

pesimismo sobre el estado de algunas antiguedades egipcias y todavia queda bastante para que se calmen las cosas.

saludos a todos y todas
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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Jue Feb 03, 2011 5:06 am

La misión italiana que estaba trabajando en la tumba de Harwa en Lúxor, al ser conscientes de los conflictos y además que solo tenian un guarda, decidieron por seguridad cerrar bien la tumba y enviar a casa a los estudiantes de arqueologia que estaban trabajando.
El día 30-31 oyeron disturbios y algunos tiros desde Casa Italia, la casa de la misión, pero nada grave.

Poco a poco, como veis se han ido cerrando las excavaciones.

Lo que muchas personas comentan es si por ejemplo objetos como los tesoros de Tutankhamón los han llevado a los sótanos de el Museo, pero Hawass no ha dicho nada al respecto. De todas formas la última noticia de Hawass es que habia pasado la noche en el museo de El cairo, pero no he oido nada más, de momento.
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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Jue Feb 03, 2011 5:17 am

Esta es la foto publicada por Hawasss de la segunda de las cabezas de momia, en las fotos que estan en alguna de las páginas webs, no se veia bien la foto





http://www.drhawass.com/photoblog/mummy


Esto es lo que comenta Hawass en su blog hoy, si alguien ya lo ha puesto ,siento repetirlo

State of Egyptian Antiquities- 3 February 2011
Again, I want to tell everyone that all the fights and fires in Tahrir Square that many people saw on television yesterday did not affect the Egyptian Museum, Cairo, at all. There were rumors that began last night that claimed the museum was on fire. I was in contact with the control room of the museum all throughout the night. The cameras of the control room can see outside of the museum into the gardens and also outside of the surrounding walls. When some people saw a car burning, they started to say that the museum was burning as well. The people spreading these rumors are idiots, because, as I have been saying in each of my statements, if the Egyptian Museum, Cairo, is safe, Egypt is safe. If there was a fire near the museum, I have the fire department located outside of the museum, and they could quickly control and put out any fire.

I am the only source of continuing truth concerning antiquities, and these rumors are aimed at making the Egyptian people look bad. If anything happens to the museum, I would bravely tell everyone all over the world because I am a man of honor, and I would never hide anything from you. It is from my heart that I tell people everywhere that I am the guardian of these monuments that belong to the whole world.

The Gezira television station has reported that the monuments of Saqqara have been damaged and items were stolen- this is not true. The army is in charge of guarding the site; I called the general there 5 minutes ago (it is now 10:30 am on February 3, 2011), and he informed me that Saqqara is safe and all the monuments are fine; nothing is damaged or stolen. The site of Lisht has excavations run by Dieter Arnold of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. The guards of the Lisht monuments called Dieter two days ago to reassure him that they were doing a good job of guarding the site. I want Dieter to know that Lisht is safe and will remain safe.

If anything happens I will announce it. I want people to know that only two things have happened so far: 1) The break-in at the Egyptian Museum, Cairo, resulting in 70 broken objects, all of which can and will be restored, and 2) The break-in at the storage magazine at Qantara, in the Sinai. We do not know exactly how many objects were stolen from this magazine, but a total of 6 boxes were taken. All of these objects came from excavations or were being stored there from the Port Said Museum. As of today, 288 objects have been returned, and I am sure that any other artifacts still missing from this magazine will be returned.
I want everyone to relax, and know that I am here and we are all watching with open eyes. I want people to know that after 9 days of protests, the monuments are safe. Why? Because the Egyptian people are protecting them.

http://www.drhawass.com/blog/state-egyptian-antiquities-3-february-2011
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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Jue Feb 03, 2011 6:58 am


Excelentes informaciones!!!
Me extraña mucho que hawass haya pasado la noche en el museo de El Cairo,
un saludo para todos
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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Jue Feb 03, 2011 7:26 am

Museums on high alert for ancient Egyptian loot

By Mohammed Abbas
LONDON (Reuters) – International museums are on high alert for looted Egyptian artifacts and some archaeologists have even offered to fly to the country to help safeguard its ancient treasures, museums said Wednesday.

Egypt has been rocked by an unprecedented nine days of demonstrations against President Hosni Mubarak's 30-year-rule, and fears are high for the country's priceless heritage after looters broke into the Egyptian Museum in Cairo last week.

The specter of the fall of Baghdad in 2003 looms large in the minds of Egyptologists, when thousands millennia-old artifacts were stolen or smashed by looters in the chaos following the fall of Saddam Hussein.

"The situation during the fall of Baghdad is the worst case scenario, but we think that's not going to happen because there is such a movement to protect the antiquities," said Karen Exell, chairwoman of Britain's Egypt Exploration Society and curator of the Egypt collection at the Manchester Museum.

Egyptologists have been heartened by the reaction of ordinary Egyptians to chaos and lawlessness.

In Cairo hundreds of people formed a chain around the museum to protect it after looters broke into the museum Friday and destroyed two Pharaonic mummies, officials said.

Western museums are still urging vigilance.

"All of us who are friends of Egypt can help the efforts to stop looting of archaeological sites, stores and museums, by focusing on the international antiquities trade," London's Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology said in a statement.

Exell said an international alert had gone out to watch for looted items, as well as offers of help. One had been posted on a global Egyptologist electronic bulletin board by a team of Spanish archaeologists, offering to help catalog artifacts.

Egypt is home to one of the world's greatest ancient civilizations, which is also a major source of tourist income.

The British Museum, home to one of the world's top collections of Egyptian antiquities, including the famed Rosetta Stone, called for more protection of the country's heritage.

"It is a matter of the greatest concern that these irreplaceable objects should be fully protected to ensure their safety and survival for future generations," the museum said.

Many key ancient Egyptian works were allowed to leave the country in previous centuries and are stored in international museums. Some critics say this is because authorities did not recognize their true value when they were unearthed.

Exell said this is not the case now.

"It's been really heartening that ordinary people are protecting sites closest to them, they understand their value ... People do feel very proud of their heritage."

(Editing by Jon Hemming)


http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20110202/sc_nm/us_britain_egypt_antiquities
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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Jue Feb 03, 2011 7:29 am

MINNAJT escribió:

Excelentes informaciones!!!
Me extraña mucho que hawass haya pasado la noche en el museo de El Cairo,
un saludo para todos

Parece que no, a pesar de que esta información habia salido en algunos medios, lo que ha pasado es que Hawass ha estado en contacto con personas del Servicio de Antiguedades el museo de El Cairo
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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Jue Feb 03, 2011 8:13 am

los ladrones entran en el Museo de El cairo, a pesar de estar vigilado e intentan robar ,sobre todo oro..¿que hacian sacando momias de un laboratorio del museo?
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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Jue Feb 03, 2011 8:55 am

En este caso no creo que hayan sido ladrones, sino gente del gobierno y lo habrá hecho pues para dar por...saco, por decirlo de alguna manera. A mí de los de Mubarak ya no me sorprende nada Mad
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MensajeTema: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Jue Feb 03, 2011 9:31 am

Las salas de laboratorio del museo, me imagino que estarian cerradas, también me imagino que la sala de tesoros de Tutankhamón, que tiene puertas que se cierran, también estaria cerrada y por supuesto la sala de tesoros de Tanis está en una sala aparte que me imagino que también se cierra, aunque de Tanis no han dicho nada.

Con el tiempo.. más adelante ya diran algo sobre lo que pasó porque hay , según las noticias, 70 objetos dañados pero que posiblemente se pueden restaurar sin problemas (aunque en alguna de las fotos que han publicado se ven cosas hechas polvo What a Face pero los expertos ya dirán algo ). Otro asunto es lo de la foto de las momias y huesos, que es una foto bastante extraña... y con el tiempo también darán una explicación sobre la misma... pero tal y como estan las coas..pasará tiempo hasta que digan algo más.


saludos a todos y todas
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MensajeTema: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Jue Feb 03, 2011 12:52 pm

Publicación de talking pyramid


Who Looted the Egyptian Museum?

As you’ve probably already heard the Egyptian Museum on Tahrir square in Cairo was ransacked and some 100 items are reportedly damaged and the heads of two mummies were removed. The Museum’s gift shop was completely cleared out by thieves. The following is a look at who was responsible for the damage and looting based on reputable news sources, eye-witness statements and Egyptologists’ reports.


The Gift Shop
Hawass has stated in the past few days that he thanks God that the looters were idiots that they mistook the Museum’s gift shop for the museum itself.

The people entered the gift shop and stole all the jewellery and escaped; they thought the shop was the museum, thank God!

Dr Hawass’ website

“I’m glad that those people were idiots. They looted the museum shop. Thank God they thought that the museum shop was the museum.”

TIME

Several initial reports stated that these looters turned out to be the museum’s own security guards and also Egyptian Police who had changed into plain clothes to disguise thier identity so they blend in with the protesters.

An official announcement yesterday from the Egypt Cultural Heritage also concluded that it was the Egyptian Museum security guards as well as Tourist Police who looted the Egyptian Museum’s gift shop after they had changed into plain clothes.

The only damage that these looters managed to do appears to have been to the ticket office and the museum gift shop was cleared of all its trinkets and books. The perpetrators of the looting of this gift shop appear to have been security guards and tourist police who had removed their uniforms.

The same day Zahi Hawass was reported as saying the gift shop was looted by ignorant criminals who thought the gift shop was part of the museum. Here is part of an interview with Michele Norris from National Public Radio on Tuesday:

Dr. Zahi Hawass was a longtime government antiquities official, and as of yesterday, the new minister of state for archeology. He says, though, he knew the museum had been broken into Friday night, he could not survey the damage until Saturday morning because of a government curfew.

Dr. HAWASS: In the ceiling of the museum, the windows are like from glasses. They broke the glasses and they were like maybe 15 feet down at night, therefore they could not see anything. Then they began to open 13 cases, and they began to look for gold. When they found no gold, they threw the statues on the ground.

NORRIS: Mm-hmm. It looked like they spent a good deal of time in the gift shop.

Dr. HAWASS: Yes, they did that.

NORRIS: Were they possibly mistaken? Did they think that that was actually part of the museum?

Dr. HAWASS: Exactly. You know, they’re ignorant people. They have no education. They are criminals. But the most important thing, the real Egyptian who love their antiquities, protect the Cairo Museum, not the police. And the army came at 10 o’clock, and they still, the commanders now, surrounding the museum from everywhere, protecting the Cairo Museum.

Egypt Sees Looting In Wake Of Protests

It seems as though Zahi Hawass is conflating those who broke into the museum’s gift shop with the “criminals” who broke through the roof as though it was the same group of people.

para seguir leyendo

http://www.talkingpyramids.com/who-looted-the-egyptian-museum/
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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Jue Feb 03, 2011 10:06 pm

gracias por las informaciones
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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Jue Feb 03, 2011 11:02 pm

Foto en el museo, expoisicón objetos de Tutankhamon




http://www.drhawass.com/photoblog/tut-exhibit

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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Jue Feb 03, 2011 11:04 pm

Foto de Hawas con dos soldados protegiendole


de su blog




aqui esta fuera del museo



http://www.drhawass.com/photoblog/soldiers
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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Jue Feb 03, 2011 11:06 pm

foto de la galeria de Tutankhamon




www.dr.hawass
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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Jue Feb 03, 2011 11:07 pm

Interior del museo




www.drhawass.com
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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Jue Feb 03, 2011 11:11 pm

.HomeInsidersAmericasWorldBusinessOp EdCultureSportTravelScienceNews for KidsEn FranÇaisDr. Zahi Hawass explains damage to Egyptian Museum
By Herald de Paris Contributor's Bureau on February 4, 2011
LONDON (Herald de Paris) - Dr. Zahi Hawass, the world’s foremost Egyptologist, issued this statement on his blog, detailing the damage to the Egyptian Museum by looters, which occurred on January 28th, 2011, as protesters against the Mubarak government took to the streets:

The Situation in Egyptian Antiquities Today

On Friday, January 28, 2011, when the protest marches began in Cairo, I heard that a curfew had been issued that started at 6.00pm on Friday evening until 7.00am on Saturday morning. Unfortunately, on that day the Egyptian Museum, Cairo, was not well guarded. About a thousand people began to jump over the wall on the eastern side of the museum into the courtyard. On the western side of the museum, we recently finished something I was very proud of, a beautiful gift shop, restaurant and cafeteria. The people entered the gift shop and stole all the jewellery and escaped; they thought the shop was the museum, thank God! However, ten people entered the museum when they found the fire exit stairs located at the back of it.

As every one knows, the Egyptian Museum, Cairo, is naturally lit and due to the architectural style of it, there are glass windows on its roof. The criminals broke the glass windows and used ropes to get inside, there is a distance of four metres from the ceiling to the ground of the museum. The ten people broke in when I was at home and, although I desperately wanted to go to the museum, I could not leave my house due to the curfew. In the morning, as soon as I woke up, I went directly there. When I arrived, I found out that, the night before, three tourist police officers had stayed there overnight because they were not able to get out before the curfew was put in place. These officers, and many young Egyptians who were also there, helped to stop more people from entering the museum. Thankfully, at 10.00pm on Friday night, the army arrived at the museum and gave additional security assistance.

I found out that one criminal was still at the museum, too. When he had asked the people guarding the museum for water, they took his hands and tied him to the door that lead to the gift shop so that he could not escape! Luckily, the criminals who stole the jewellery from the gift shop did not know where the jewellery inside the museum is kept. They went into the Late Period gallery but, when they found no gold, they broke thirteen vitrines and threw the antiquities on the floor. Then the criminals went to the King Tutankhamun galleries. Thank God they opened only one case! The criminals found a statue of the king on a panther, broke it, and threw it on the floor. I am very thankful that all of the antiquities that were damaged in the museum can be restored, and the tourist police caught all of the criminals that broke into it. On Saturday, the army secured the museum again and guarded it from all sides. I left the museum at 3.00pm on Saturday, 29, 2011.
What is really beautiful is that not all Egyptians were involved in the looting of the museum. A very small number of people tried to break, steal and rob. Sadly, one criminal voice is louder than one hundred voices of peace. The Egyptian people are calling for freedom, not destruction. When I left the museum on Saturday, I was met outside by many Egyptians, who asked if the museum was safe and what they could do to help. The people were happy to see an Egyptian official leave his home and come to Tahrir Square without fear; they loved that I came to the museum.

The curfew started again on Saturday afternoon at 4.00pm, and I was receiving messages all night from my inspectors at Saqqara, Dahsur, and Mit Rahina. The magazines and stores of Abusir were opened, and I could not find anyone to protect the antiquities at the site. At this time I still do not know what has happened at Saqqara, but I expect to hear from the inspectors there soon. East of Qantara in the Sinai, we have a large store containing antiquities from the Port Said Museum. Sadly, a large group, armed with guns and a truck, entered the store, opened the boxes in the magazine and took the precious objects. Other groups attempted to enter the Coptic Museum, Royal Jewellery Museum, National Museum of Alexandria, and El Manial Museum. Luckily, the foresighted employees of the Royal Jewellery Museum moved all of the objects into the basement, and sealed it before leaving.

My heart is broken and my blood is boiling. I feel that everything I have done in the last nine years has been destroyed in one day, but all the inspectors, young archaeologists, and administrators, are calling me from sites and museums all over Egypt to tell me that they will give their life to protect our antiquities. Many young Egyptians are in the streets trying to stop the criminals. Due to the circumstances, this behaviour is not surprising; criminals and people without a conscience will rob their own country. If the lights went off in New York City, or London, even if only for an hour, criminal behaviour will occur. I am very proud that Egyptians want to stop these criminals to protect Egypt and its heritage.

At this time, the Internet has not been restored in Egypt. I had to fax this statement to my colleagues in Italy for it to be uploaded in London on my website.

http://www.drhawass.com/blog/situation-egyptian-antiquities-today

MORE articles on this subject by the Herald de Paris: Open Letter to the UN Secretary General




video

http://www.heralddeparis.com/dr-zahi-hawass-explains-damage-to-egyptian-museum/123011
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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Vie Feb 04, 2011 3:59 am

gracias por las informaciones y fotos

saludos a todos/as
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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Vie Feb 04, 2011 1:39 pm

World museums on high alert for ancient Egyptian loot
International museums are on high alert for looted Egyptian artifacts and some archaeologists have even offered to fly to the country to help safeguard its ancient treasures

Egypt has been rocked by an unprecedented nine days of demonstrations against President Hosni Mubarak's 30-year-rule, and fears are high for the country's priceless heritage after looters broke into the Egyptian Museum in Cairo last week.

The specter of the fall of Baghdad in 2003 looms large in the minds of Egyptologists, when thousands millennia-old artifacts were stolen or smashed by looters in the chaos following the fall of Saddam Hussein.

"The situation during the fall of Baghdad is the worst case scenario, but we think that's not going to happen because there is such a movement to protect the antiquities," said Karen Exell, chairwoman of Britain's Egypt Exploration Society and curator of the Egypt collection at the Manchester Museum.

Egyptologists have been heartened by the reaction of ordinary Egyptians to chaos and lawlessness.

In Cairo hundreds of people formed a chain around the museum to protect it after looters broke into the museum on Friday and destroyed two Pharaonic mummies, officials said.

Western museums are still urging vigilance.

"All of us who are friends of Egypt can help the efforts to stop looting of archaeological sites, stores and museums, by focusing on the international antiquities trade," London's Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology said in a statement.

Exell said an international alert had gone out to watch for looted items, as well as offers of help. One had been posted on a global Egyptologist electronic bulletin board by a team of Spanish archaeologists, offering to help catalog artefacts.

Egypt is home to one of the world's greatest ancient civilizations, which is also a major source of tourist income.

The British Museum, home to one of the world's top collections of Egyptian antiquities, including the famed Rosetta Stone, called for more protection of the country's heritage.

"It is a matter of the greatest concern that these irreplaceable objects should be fully protected to ensure their safety and survival for future generations," the museum said.

Many key ancient Egyptian works were allowed to leave the country in previous centuries and are stored in international museums. Some critics say this is because authorities did not recognize their true value when they were unearthed.

Exell said this is not the case now.

"It's been really heartening that ordinary people are protecting sites closest to them, they understand their value ... People do feel very proud of their heritage."


http://english.ahram.org.eg/NewsContent/9/0/5006/Heritage//World--museums-on-high-alert-for-ancient-Egyptian-.aspx
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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Vie Feb 04, 2011 1:40 pm

The State of Egyptian Antiquities- 4 February 2011
Today is a new day, but there are still marches in the streets of Cairo. I am personally very sad for my country. I cannot believe the devastation that has happened in the streets, and that so much has stopped in the last 11 days. We have lost so much, and I do not understand how this could be. It is like a dream for me. I have come into this new position at a very critical time, but the most important thing about this is that for the first time in history Egypt has a Ministry of Antiquities. The reason that this has never happened before was because archaeology was considered a minor thing. Previously, the Supreme Council of Antiquities (SCA) had fallen under the ministries of education, tourism, and, most recently, culture. Now, I am happy to say that there is a Ministry of Antiquities that is separate from the Ministry of Culture.

When I was appointed as the Secretary General of the SCA in 2002, I could do a lot more than I was able to before. I could bring billions of dollars to my country through archaeology. I had a made plan in my mind in 1969, when I was an antiquities inspector at Tuna Gebel. Throughout the course of my life, I was able to follow most of this plan, but today, and for the last 10 days, I cannot think. I have not written one word on any archaeological topics because looking at what has happened to my country, I feel sad. Egypt is my life. I cannot leave the country and live in any other part of the world. I want to die in the sands of Egypt. The most important aspect of my life is to protect my antiquities, and I was astonished to hear all of the rumors about Egypt’s antiquities. I am very concerned that several members of the archaeological community have not called me directly to confirm what the rumors they have heard.

What is strange is that from the very beginning of the trouble, when the Internet was off, I was still able to send a daily report to my website, www.drhawass.com. These reports were sent by fax to Italy to enable them to be posted on my website for everyone read, therefore I cannot understand why the rumors still spread. This makes me very upset because we, the Egyptian people, defended the monuments! The most important thing everyone needs to know is that the people in the streets defended the museums, monuments, and sites. When I came into work today, I had to pass through a checkpoint. When the men in the Popular Committees running the checkpoint saw me, they asked, “Sir, how is the museum?” These men may not know how to read or write, but they are worried about their cultural heritage.

From the first day of protests, I have had an operation room running 24 hours in my Zamalek office. This operation room is connected by telephone with every museum and site in Egypt: Jewish synagogues, Coptic monasteries, Muslim mosques, and ancient Pharaonic, Greek, and Roman sites. We have been producing detailed reports daily. I hope that people all over the world will read my statements and not listen to rumors.

Many people have been saying that Saqqara was looted and it is not true. If anything had happened there, the operation room in Zamalek would have called me immediately and reported what happened. I hope that you will all read each of the statements I have released on my website that say all our sites are safe. The army, curators, antiquities inspectors, and security guards guarded the important sites. As I have said everyday, the only two incidents that have occurred are the break-in at the Egyptian Museum, Cairo, and the break-in at the storage magazine in Qantara East, in the Sinai.

As I have already stated, nothing was stolen from the museum; 70 objects were damaged but can be restored. Unfortunately, we cannot restore them now, as we had hoped, because the museum is closed and surrounded by the commanders of the army. The curators are stationed in the control room, and the cameras in the control room can see outside and inside of the museum. We are thankful for all of the offers of help that we have received, but the conservation lab of the EMC can do this easily and beautifully. Egyptians have completed restoration work before this black week began, and we will continue our work when this time passes.

Yesterday, I received a report from Mohamed Abdel Maksoud, the general director of Lower Egypt, that 288 objects stolen from the storage magazine in Qantara East in the Sinai have been returned. He also confirmed that these objects and statues constitute everything that was taken. Of course, the final word can only come when things are calm, and the storage magazine can be subjected to a full inventory. I am confident, however, based on the report, that the 288 objects do make up the total of all of the stolen ones.

The people who are in Europe and America are concerned about Egypt, but what is import to remember is that rumors can be very damaging. These people do not understand our feelings as Egyptians; when I come to Zamalek everyday and when I go to Saqqara, Giza, or the Egyptian Museum, or when call Luxor, Aswan, or the other sites outside of Cairo, it is very stressful. I have young people working and helping in my office 24 hours a day. I have two brave young ladies working for me: Stephanie from America and Beth from Britain. These ladies have been working, with some of my Egyptian assistants and employees, in the office everyday since the protests started, and they are typing up many reports in Arabic and English for me. Stephanie and Beth have decided not to leave Egypt.

I hope that my reports will help you all to feel calm. Each of of my daily reports have been posted on my website, drhawass.com, and the SCA website, http://www.sca-egypt.org/eng/MR_PR.htm. You all know me, if anything happens I will report it right away. Again, and again, and again I tell you that the monuments of Egypt are safe. Mrs. Irina Bokova, Director General of UNESCO, called me twice yesterday and I gave her the full report that I wrote today, and sent her all the previous reports that I have written; she was so happy to receive the good news. Francesco Bandarin, the director of the UNESCO World Heritage Center, called and was also happy to hear good news. I would like to thank National Geographic, CIPEG, and Blue Shield, for offering words of support as well.

http://www.drhawass.com/blog/state-egyptian-antiquities-4-february-2011-0?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Drhawasscom-New+%28DrHawass.com+-+What%27s+new%3F+Feed%29&utm_content=Google+Reader
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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Vie Feb 04, 2011 1:41 pm

http://www.sca-egypt.org/eng/pdfs/Press_release_03-02-2011.pdf
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MensajeTema: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Vie Feb 04, 2011 2:39 pm

Egypt Update: Rare Tomb May Have Been Destroyed
by Andrew Lawler

Reports of damage to one of the few ancient Egyptian tombs devoted solely to a woman have tempered the news that most of Egypt's priceless antiquities have escaped damage and that teams of foreign archaeologists are safe amid widespread protests against the regime led by Hosni Mubarak.

One archaeologist present at the famous cemetery of Saqqara, south of Cairo, said that as many as 200 looters were digging for treasure in the area this past weekend before police resecured the area. The excavator, who requested anonymity, added that the tomb of Maya, the wet nurse of King Tutankhamun, was "completely destroyed." Another Western archaeologist said, "We still don't know the extent of the damage, but things have been bad and out of control."

None of the Molotov cocktails hurled yesterday around Tahrir Square, home of the Museum of Egyptian Antiquities , damaged the building or its contents, according to Zahi Hawass, the minister of antiquities. His blog explains that he has been in contact with the museum control room and that there was no damage beyond last weekend's break-in, which damaged 70 artifacts. Hawass also vehemently denied that there has been heavy looting in Saqqara.

Hawass did say that six boxes were stolen from a storeroom at a site on the Sinai Peninsula but that many objects had since been returned. Concerns remain that the small museum at Memphis, the ancient Egyptian capital, has been thoroughly looted. There was good news at Giza, however. Mark Lehner, the Cambridge, Massachusetts-based archaeologist who digs at the pyramid-builders town, said the site was not damaged, as was reported earlier in the week.

Foreign archaeologists in Luxor say the situation in that city far to the south was normal. W. Raymond Johnson, who heads the University of Chicago team there, said that after some weekend rioting all was quiet and that there was no damage to any site. His team resumed work on Sunday. He added that American, French, German, and Egyptian teams "are all checking up on each other." The situation is so normal, in fact, that he noted "there were 10 tour buses" in the parking lot of one ancient Luxor temple yesterday afternoon.

At Amarna, once the capital of Egypt under the pharaoh Akhenaten and his queen Nefertiti, all is "as peaceful as ever," says Barry Kemp, a University of Cambridge archaeologist who is still at the site. An attempt to loot archaeological magazines on the other side of the Nile River was thwarted by police, he said. "Order has not broken down in the countryside as it has in Cairo," he says.

Kemp said all foreign expeditions were ordered on Saturday to halt work and leave. Most of his team has since left, and he intends to travel to Cairo soon "to sit it out until I can come back."
http://news.sciencemag.org/scienceinsider/2011/02/egypt-update-rare-tomb-may-have.html?ref=ra
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MensajeTema: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Sáb Feb 05, 2011 1:34 am

Headless Egyptian Mummy Mystery Thickens
The mummies have become the symbol of the world's concern for ancient Egyptian cultural heritage.

Rosella Lorenzi

THE GIST
Egyptologists still don't know the identities of the two mummies whose heads were ripped off during a break-in at Cairo's Egyptian Museum.
Initial reports that they could be King Tut's great-grandparents turned out to be unfounded.
Based on evidence available so far, it's fairly clear that the mummies are non-royals.
enlargeOne of the heads from a mummy damaged during the break-in at Cairo's Egyptian Museum appears in the photo above. Click to enlarge this image.
Zahi Hawass Website

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The mummies, who lost their heads as yet another casualty of Egypt's political chaos, are unknown ancient Egyptians, officials told Discovery News. Prior to the uprisings that spread across the Arab nation, they had been undergoing testing to determine their identities.

Vandalized a week ago at Cairo's Egyptian Museum, where thieves looking for antiquities broke 70 objects, the mummies have become the symbol of the world's concern for ancient Egyptian cultural heritage.

The shocking image of their heads lying on the floor of the Egyptian Museum with broken bones scattered all around have been haunting Egyptologists and mummy experts for a week.

Despite close examinations of the released pictures, extensive archival research and opinion exchange on social networks, no expert has been able to identify them.

"It's starting to take on the hallmarks of a TV drama like 'Bones' or 'CSI.' Just who were the two mummies?" Kate Phizackerley, who runs "Egyptological Looting Database 2011," asked in her blog.

Fear that royal mummies could have been damaged arose with the first news reports of the break-in, which mentioned looters ripping off the heads of two Pharaonic mummies.

Indeed, a gilded, open-work cartonnage case belonging to Tjuya, shown on the museum floor in dramatic footage from Al Jazeera, prompted speculation that the damaged mummies were Yuya and Tjuya, which recent DNA tests identified as King Tut's great-grandparents.

"We all feared they could be Yuya and Thuya, but the pictures proved they weren't," Phizackerley said.

Further information from Zahi Hawass, newly appointed minister of antiquities, did not help solve the mystery.

In an interview with the New York Times on Tuesday, Hawass said that the thieves took two skulls from a research lab before being stopped as they tried to leave the museum.

Wafaa El Saddik, former director of the Egyptian Museum, confirmed to Discovery News that the mummies had been in a research lab.

"These mummies were kept in a special room at the west side of the museum and they were in the university clinic for some research. They are unknown persons," El Saddik, who led the museum until a month ago, told Discovery News.

The new information makes it even harder to guess who the mummies might be.

"They might never have been in display," Phizackerley said.

Researchers were particularly intrigued by one mummy, whose ripped-off head was photographed amid bones scattered across the floor.

"The bones in the picture apparently do not belong to the heads. Quite certainly we are talking of non-royal mummies," Swiss anatomist and paleopathologist Frank Rühli, told Discovery News.

Egyptologist and anthropologist Jasmine Day from Perth, Australia, agrees: "Many of the royal mummies have distinct facial features and even intact hair. The damaged mummies and bones appear to have been knocked accidentally -- or tossed vindictively -- off a table or shelf in the darkened storeroom."

Confirmation that at least one head had been torn from a complete and well preserved body came from a picture found online by Mercedes González, director of the Instituto de Estudios Científicos en Momias in Madrid, Spain.

The photo completely matched the image of the damaged mummy.

According to the Chilean journal Conozca Más, which published the picture of the complete mummy in 1993, the mummified body was displayed at the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, and then withdrawn.

"By the shape of the forehead and jaw, I believe this is the mummy of a teenage woman. It is interesting that the body has no abdominal incision for evisceration," González told Discovery News.

She agrees with Rühli, head of the Swiss Mummy Project at the University of Zurich, that the bones scattered around the mummified head do not belong to the individual.

"They appear to correspond to an adult. There is no soft tissue on them, while the mummy featured bones which were covered by skin in very good condition," González said.

Regarding the other head, shown on Hawass' website, González believes it belongs to an adult male.

"The nostrils are dilated, due to plugs of linen employed during the embalming, while the white spots may be fungi. This might indicate that the mummy was stored somewhere out of sight," González said.

According to the researcher, the well cut neck might indicate that the head was already loose, torn from its body long ago. Indeed, that was a typical practice of the 19th century.

"It is tragic to see Egyptian mummies treated once more in the cavalier and cruel fashion in which tens of thousands of their fellows were once treated by ancient Egyptian tomb robbers and Victorian souvenir hunters," Day, the author of "The Mummy's Curse: Mummymania in the English-Speaking World," said.

"I never thought I would witness such things in my lifetime," Day said.

http://news.discovery.com/archaeology/egypt-headless-mummies-identity-110204.html
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MensajeTema: Re: Daños y destrozos en antigüedades   Sáb Feb 05, 2011 2:09 am

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