egiptomaníacos2007

Historia del Egipto Faraónico
 
ÍndicePortalFAQBuscarRegistrarseMiembrosGrupos de UsuariosConectarse

Comparte | 
 

 Zahi Hawass

Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Ir abajo 
AutorMensaje
Nefer



Cantidad de envíos : 63
Fecha de inscripción : 17/12/2010

MensajeTema: Zahi Hawass   Dom Jun 05, 2011 1:23 pm

Sabeis si Zahi Hawass sigue siendo ministro? si estan juzgando a todo el gobierno de antes ¿van a juzgarle a él?


muchas gracias y hasta mi próximo rato de internet.
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
Maat



Cantidad de envíos : 10289
Fecha de inscripción : 17/06/2007

MensajeTema: Re: Zahi Hawass   Dom Jun 05, 2011 10:09 pm

Nefer escribió:
Sabeis si Zahi Hawass sigue siendo ministro? si estan juzgando a todo el gobierno de antes ¿van a juzgarle a él?


muchas gracias y hasta mi próximo rato de internet.


Sigue siendo ministro y creo que no tiene ninguna causa pendiente de juicio.

saludos
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
elvira



Cantidad de envíos : 675
Fecha de inscripción : 16/11/2007

MensajeTema: Re: Zahi Hawass   Lun Jun 06, 2011 11:37 pm

Es extraño pero sigue siendo ministro Twisted Evil
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
Ramses User Maat Ra



Cantidad de envíos : 3871
Edad : 30
Localisation : Abydos
Fecha de inscripción : 19/12/2007

MensajeTema: Re: Zahi Hawass   Mar Jun 07, 2011 4:59 am

No es tan extraño, las autoridades egipcias actuales aplicaron eso de "más vale malo conocido que bueno por conocer" y está claro que es un personaje idóneo para relanzar el turismo con sus viajes, teorías, anuncios a bombo y platillo de toda suerte de "descubrimientos" o "re-re-reedescubrimientos" pero bueno, él es así, es capaz de enfadarse e irse de una rueda de prensa si no logra silencio, gusta de captar toda la atención a su alrededor, es un autentico showman.

Así que nada, pasaron por alto sus pataletas y desavenencias con la política y 'pelillos a la mar' con él, al menos a priori no creo que sea reemplazado, Egipto lo necesita al fin y al cabo.

Saludos
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
SHADY



Cantidad de envíos : 4349
Localisation : Montevideo
Fecha de inscripción : 15/05/2010

MensajeTema: Re: Zahi Hawass   Mar Jun 07, 2011 6:35 am


Rámsés lleva toda la razón. Puede que muchos extranjeros no entiendan el porqué de las actitudes, pero Egipto lo necesita.

Además creo que es inteligentísimo y muy conciente de la imagen que proyecta, y hasta creo que lo hace a propósito con humor. Lo cierto es que ha conseguido, que a través de él, de la simpatía o el rechazo que genera, Egipto siempre esté en el tapete. Muchísimo más de lo que han conseguido otros de la misma jerarquía, en países con tesoros arqueológicos.

A mi me causan mucha gracia las actitudes y las poses de Hawass. Se lo ha acusado de corrupción, de venta de antigüedades, etc. y puede que algo haya, que nadie es santo. Pero debe ser uno de los personajes más controlados en ese sentido, porque siempre está en la mira, y él mismo se ha encargado de que así sea. No quiero ni pensar lo que harán los ministros de antigüedades de otros países a los que nunca se les menciona ni se les conoce el nombre! affraid
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
Kmt



Cantidad de envíos : 1405
Fecha de inscripción : 19/05/2010

MensajeTema: Re: Zahi Hawass   Miér Jul 13, 2011 2:17 am

Revolution Dims Star Power of Egypt’s Antiquities Chief
By KATE TAYLOR
Until recently Zahi Hawass, Egypt’s antiquities minister, was a global symbol of Egyptian national pride. A famous archaeologist in an Indiana Jones hat, he was virtually unassailable in the old Egypt, protected by his success in boosting tourism, his efforts to reclaim lost artifacts and his closeness to the country’s first lady, Suzanne Mubarak.

But the revolution changed all that.

Now demonstrators in Cairo are calling for his resignation as the interim government faces disaffected crowds in Tahrir Square.

Their primary complaint is his association with the Mubaraks, whom he defended in the early days of the revolution. But the upheaval has also drawn attention to the ways he has increased his profile over the years, often with the help of organizations and companies with which he has done business as a government official.

He receives, for example, an honorarium each year of as much as $200,000 from National Geographic to be an explorer-in-residence even as he controls access to the ancient sites it often features in its reports.

He has relationships — albeit ones he says he does not profit from — with two American companies that do business in Egypt.

One, Arts and Exhibitions International, secured Mr. Hawass’s permission several years ago to take some of the country’s most precious treasures, the artifacts of King Tut, on a world tour; its top executives recently started a separate venture to market a Zahi Hawass line of clothing.

A second company, Exhibit Merchandising, has been selling replicas of Mr. Hawass’s hat for several years. Last year that company was hired to operate a new store in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

Mr. Hawass says his share of the profits from those products goes directly to Egyptian charities. But the fact that both charities, a children’s cancer hospital and a children’s museum, were overseen by Ms. Mubarak before the revolution has angered some critics.

“We don’t know how Egyptians lived all this time under this government or under these people,” said Entessar Gharieb, a radio announcer with a degree in archaeology who helped organize a recent protest calling for Mr. Hawass’s removal. “Zahi Hawass was one of this system, the system of Hosni Mubarak.”

Remarkably, given his Mubarak ties, Mr. Hawass has been able to hold on to his government post through the aftershocks of the revolution, though he resigned briefly in March and was reinstated. He travels a lot, serving as a cultural ambassador, praising the revolution and urging foreigners to visit Egypt. This month Peru honored him for his help in securing the return of artifacts that had been taken from Machu Picchu nearly a century ago.

“You can feel the energy in the air when he speaks to people about Egypt,” said John Norman, the president of Arts and Exhibitions International, which runs the Tut tour.

Nonetheless, Mr. Hawass remains dogged at home by unflattering reports in newspapers and on television. The gift shop at the Egyptian Museum had to be closed after a dispute over how the contract was awarded threatened to land him in jail. And critics have gone to Egyptian prosecutors with complaints about Mr. Hawass’s relationship with National Geographic and other matters.

“I have never done anything at all contrary to Egyptian law,” Mr. Hawass said in an e-mail response to questions. “Egyptian law permits government employees to accept honoraria and fees through outside contracts.”

The accusations against Mr. Hawass are much less serious than those made against other former government officials, but they show how quickly the landscape has tilted.

“I think he’s going to have to realize that there is a new way of doing business, or at least there may be,” said Michael C. Dunn, the editor of The Middle East Journal, a scholarly publication.

National Geographic first brought Mr. Hawass on as an explorer-in-residence, one of 16 it has around the world, in 2001 when he was director of the Giza pyramids. He has appeared in numerous National Geographic films about ancient Egypt, and the organization publishes some of his books and arranges his speaking engagements, for which he asks $15,000.

It is not clear how the National Geographic payments compare in size to Mr. Hawass’s government salary, which he would not disclose. National Geographic says it pays Mr. Hawass to advise it on major discoveries and help shape its policies on antiquities issues. It says it has never received preferential access to archaeological sites or discoveries.

Mr. Hawass said his impartiality was evident when the Discovery Channel won out over National Geographic in a bid to make films about DNA research on royal mummies.

“All proposals about films go before a committee,” he said in an e-mail, “and decisions are made to maximize both the scientific results and the profit for Egypt.”

But Mr. Hawass also said this week that he has decided to resign temporarily as a National Geographic explorer so that he can focus on protecting antiquities
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/13/world/middleeast/13hawass.html?_r=2&ref=egypt
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
Aicha



Cantidad de envíos : 1479
Edad : 35
Localisation : Maru Atón
Fecha de inscripción : 28/04/2009

MensajeTema: Re: Zahi Hawass   Vie Mayo 23, 2014 9:14 am

Ya ha sido absuelto de todos sus cargos, se le echa de menos... Rolling Eyes 
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
Semíramis
Admin


Cantidad de envíos : 45941
Localisation : KV 43
Fecha de inscripción : 10/06/2007

MensajeTema: Re: Zahi Hawass   Vie Mayo 23, 2014 11:11 pm

sí, absuelto y está realzando cursos y conferencias
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario http://nieblaysombras.blogspot.com/
Aicha



Cantidad de envíos : 1479
Edad : 35
Localisation : Maru Atón
Fecha de inscripción : 28/04/2009

MensajeTema: Re: Zahi Hawass   Sáb Mayo 24, 2014 3:05 am

Semíramis escribió:
sí, absuelto y está realzando cursos y conferencias
¿Sii? Qué bien, me alegro mucho por él, ojalá pronto lo volvamos a ver en reportajes etc...es todo un personaje  Cool 
Volver arriba Ir abajo
Ver perfil de usuario
Contenido patrocinado




MensajeTema: Re: Zahi Hawass   Hoy a las 10:17 am

Volver arriba Ir abajo
 
Zahi Hawass
Ver el tema anterior Ver el tema siguiente Volver arriba 
Página 1 de 1.
 Temas similares
-
» Entrevista a ZAHI HAWASS
» Inside the Egyptian Museum With Zahi Hawass
» Zahi Hawass and the Museum Gift Shop
» Sabías que Zahi Hawass recibía al año 140.000 euros de National Geographic, y que....
» Cleopatra, Hawass y Goddio

Permisos de este foro:No puedes responder a temas en este foro.
egiptomaníacos2007 :: 

OFF TOPIC

 :: Off Topic
-
Cambiar a: