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 El hombre E

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Akenaton



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MensajeTema: Re: El hombre E   Sáb Sep 17, 2011 8:44 pm

interesantes formas de catigo para culpables, y querrian que esos cuerpos desaparecieran
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Ramses User Maat Ra



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MensajeTema: Re: El hombre E   Sáb Sep 17, 2011 10:23 pm

Si, el empalamiento era una práctica empleada en determiados crimenes. Como dices este cuerpo debía encontrarse probablemente en el Valle de los Reyes cuando los sacerdotes de la XXI dinastía comenzaron a trasladar los cuerpos de los reyes, reinas y principes al que sería el escondrijo DB320, ahora bien no solo es evidente el parentesco real sino que quienes quedaron a cargo de su cuerpo qusieron que perdurara. Por otra parte no veo motivos para pensar que fuera introducido tiempo después en el escondrijo, creo que fue llevado alli en el mismo periodo que los personajes de su época y anteriores.

Quizás se le da más bombo del que merece el asunto, eso es lo que pretenden los que ganan dinero con ello, pero lo cierto es que no deja de llamar la atención este personaje, sus circunstancias y como no su propio cuerpo.

Saludos
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miguelangel_1980



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MensajeTema: Re: El hombre E   Miér Sep 21, 2011 5:54 am

la cara de esa momia es de dolor...
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MensajeTema: Re: El hombre E   Miér Dic 19, 2012 12:45 am

http://www.bmj.com/content/345/bmj.e8268

relacionado con la muerte de Ramses III
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MensajeTema: Re: El hombre E   Mar Jul 08, 2014 1:39 pm



The contorted features of Unknown Man E have inspired imaginative speculations for over a century.
Photo Source: National Geographic Society

After removing the layer of chemicals, the examiners discovered the body of a young man estimated to be around 23-24 years of age. His face was contorted into a grimace and the muscles of his abdomen were severely constricted. By making a small opening in the lower back region of the mummy, Fouquet discovered that the internal organs were still in place contrary to the usual Egyptian practice of removing them. The penis was also still intact, although it was missing when G. E. Smith examined the mummy years later. Maspero stated that Unknown Man E had been circumcised but Fouquet was not certain about this, and believed that the glans could have been exposed (perhaps by the pressure of the bandages?) at the time the mummy was wrapped and was not necessarily evidence of circumcision.
Unknown Man E's ears had been pierced, and his gold earrings were still in place. Fouquet described them as hollow tubes "tapered at both ends and bent back to form an ellipse" and notes that they are identical to earrings found on the mummy of Pinudjem I. However, since earrings of this style were manufactured during a wide range of historical periods, they offered little information that could be of use in dating Unknown Man E's burial. Bickerstaffe mentions the interesting fact that the embalmers had not stolen these earrings. Two canes with heads made out of braided reeds were also found in Unknown Man E's coffin. The significance of the canes is unknown, but Bickerstaffe relates that at a lecture given by Geoffrey Martin, his attention was called to the fact that Maya, Tutankhamen's treasurer, had been depicted in his tomb holding two canes. The current location of the earrings and canes found with Unknown Man E is not known. They may have been misplaced somewhere in the Cairo Museum, or perhaps stolen and sold on the antiquities market.

http://anubis4_2000.tripod.com/UnknownManE/ManE.htm
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MensajeTema: Re: El hombre E   Jue Mar 10, 2016 6:11 am




The uninscribed coffin of Unknown Man E with inset photo of interior.
Photo Source: Pat Remler/www.archeology.org.


Several theories have been advanced to explain the unusual features of this burial. The examiners first hypothesized that Unknown Man E had been impaled because his perineum was badly torn. This idea was abandoned, however, when Fouquet determined that the large intestine was undamaged and that the anal injury must have been post mortem. The second theory proposed that Unknown Man E had died after ingesting some kind of convulsant poison. Based primarily on the observable constriction of the abdomen, which was initially interpreted as evidence of violent convulsions, this theory seemed weakened by a more thorough consideration of the manner in which the preservative chemicals had reacted with the body tissues over time. Since the internal organs had not been removed, they slowly shrank under the dehydrating effect of the chemicals and consequently constricted the abdominal area. However, as George B. Johnson pointed out to me in a recent communication, the fact that the digestive organs contained no traces of food is also indicative of poisoning since any stomach contents would most likely have been voided by vomiting after the ingestion of a toxic substance.
A third theory, which remains popular to this day, was finally proposed, namely that Unknown Man E had been buried alive, probably for committing some terrible crime. Maspero even went so far as to suggest (in contradiction to his earlier 18'th Dynasty dating of the mummy) that Unknown Man E may actually be Pentewere, the 20'th Dynasty prince implicated in the famous harem conspiracy to assassinate Ramesses III. All the peculiar features of the burial seemed explicable given the assumption that Unknown Man E had been buried alive. His contorted expression, the fact that the organs had not been removed, the tightly bound wrappings, the taboo sheepskin, and the coffin lacking in the magical spells needed to safeguard the spirit of the deceased in the Underworld seemed to fit neatly with the theory of premature burial. (One could even interpret the two canes found with Unknown Man E as "bastinados" used to whip the soles of his feet during an interrogation prior to his premature burial.)
All these theories make the following assumptions: (i.) that Unknown Man E had been "embalmed" by Egyptians; (ii.) that his facial expression indicated that he died in great pain; and (iii.) that the divergences from common Egyptian funerary practices found in his burial were forms of ritual degradation and punishment. These assumptions arose in the minds of observers whose evaluations of the burial were demonstrably discolored by subjective reactions to the admittedly unpleasant odor and physical appearance of the mummy.
Had Maspero, Fouquet and Mathey not been so influenced by Unknown Man E's frightful grimace, they would have probably concluded that the unusual features of his burial had a more plausible explanation than the premature burial theory provided. These features seem to indicate that Unknown Man E's mummy had been prepared by non-Egyptian embalmers who were only partly familiar with Egyptian methods of preserving the dead, and exhibit the kind of "mixed" characteristics that one would expect in a burial that had occurred outside of Egypt in a territory of the Empire influenced to some extent by Egyptian customs. The use of natron as a preservative, the wrapping of the body in expensive linens, and the anthropoid coffin are all classic Egyptian elements. But the sheepskin shroud and the use of calcium oxide as a preservative are foreign features which can be traced to funerary practices in non-Egyptian parts of the Mediterranean.
The use of calcium oxide seems to point toward an ancient Greek influence. In Greek, the word "sarcophagus" means "flesh eater" and was used to designate the large stone receptacles filled with quicklime (CaO) in which corpses were placed. Much more harsh in its desiccating properties than natural Egyptian natron, this chemical would have been avoided by Egyptian embalmers who wanted to preserve rather than destroy the tissues of the body. The Greeks who used this method of treating corpses mistakenly believed that Egyptian sarcophagi were employed for the same purpose. Whether this use of quicklime was peculiar to the Greeks or spread throughout the Mediterranean and Middle East is at present unknown to me.
The fact that the natron and quicklime mixture had been carefully distributed over Unknown Man E's body is inconsistent with the idea of premature burial. Even had he been tied and held down, the man would have struggled as the highly caustic chemical burned and destroyed his skin, thereby making its application far from neat. Maspero observed that those responsible for "embalming" Unknown Man E must have had a lot of experience in using this technique, and this further points to a non-Egyptian source for the method of preparing the mummy. Where in Egypt could one gain such experience? No other Egyptian mummy yet discovered was embalmed in this fashion.
The observation that the natron and lime mixture was still able to absorb moisture from the air indicates that it had not been completely hydrated, or saturated, by body fluids. Yet there is more than enough liquid in the body of an adult man to saturate the quantity of the chemicals used to coat Unknown Man E's body to the thickness measured by Mathey. Had these chemicals become saturated, it is unlikely that the fluids absorbed by them would have evaporated over the years since they were covered with two layers of tightly bound bandages (with the innermost layer soaked in resins that had hardened to form a shell-like covering.) Over these was placed the sheepskin, and finally a coffin lid, all of which could have prevented the evaporation of any moisture absorbed by the hygroscopic chemicals. (That substances can endure for centuries in an aqueous condition is proven by the liquid found in the canopic chest of IV'th Dynasty Queen Hetepheres.) The fact that some calcium oxide was still present on Unknown Man E in an unhydrated state suggests that it was applied after his body had already been partly desiccated by some other means, perhaps by laying on hot sand in sunlight. This, of course, entails that he was dead when the embalmers wrapped him.
The fact that wool remained on the sheepskin which enshrouded Unknown Man E is also significant in that it proves that the hide had been cured. (Wool, fur and hair all slough off uncured hides.) It was not simply skinned and wrapped about the body in an untreated condition so that it would slowly shrink and suffocate the person unfortunate enough to be encased within. (Such a method of torture/execution was used by certain American Indian tribes, and it is sometimes stated incorrectly that this was how Unknown Man E met his end.) Since such sheepskins were deemed ritually unclean by the Egyptians one must wonder where in Egypt such a commodity, which would take time, skill, and experience to prepare, could be found. A more likely explanation for the sheepskin is that it had been prepared outside of Egypt in a country where such hides were valued and used in burials. In his article, Bickerstaffe points out that the Hyksos were buried with sheep, and that the Tale of Sinhue describes "Asiatics" as being buried wrapped in sheepskins. This again indicates that Unknown Man E was probably "embalmed" in a foreign country where sheepskins were cured and employed in a funereal context.
If Unknown Man E had lain in the open for some period of time, rigor mortis would have set in and he would have preserved the posture in which he died. The embalmers would have experienced difficulty in placing him in the traditional pose used in burials, and this might explain the tightness with which the bandages had been wrapped about the body. They needed to tightly wrap Unknown Man E in order to keep him straightened out.
Based on all these observations, it is possible to recreate a scenerio capable of explaining Unknown Man E's burial without recourse to the premature burial hypothesis. We know from the expensive linen wrappings, the golden earrings, the cedar wood coffin, and perhaps the two canes (which may be a sign of office) that Unknown Man E possessed high social rank. He may have been an Egyptian governor or dignitary of some sort living in one of the Palestinian outposts of the Egyptian Empire during the New Kingdom. (G. E. Smith confirmed Maspero's first opinion by dating the mummy to the XVIII'th Dynasty, no later than the reign of Tuthmosis II.) He may have died while hunting in the desert, and was not found immediately. By that time, the body had stiffened into a pose and facial expression inappropriate for burial, and had also become semi-desiccated. The provincial embalmers did their best to preserve him in a proper Egyptian manner, but fell back upon local embalming procedures and funerary customs. Unknown Man E was treated by these foreign embalmers with natron and quicklime, wrapped tightly to straighten his limbs into an acceptable position, and given a sheepskin shroud (which may have been a mark of honor among their race.)
Unknown Man E, like most adult Egyptians, had begun preparing for his funeral and already had an undecorated coffin made of locally obtained cedar wood. The local embalmers placed him in this coffin, and, since they probably did not know how to inscribe or decorate it in the traditional Egyptian manner, simply left it blank and shipped it, along with its occupant, back to Egypt. After arriving in Egypt, the horrified Egyptian necropolis officials would have discovered the offensive sheepskin. Not wishing to touch it, they decided to leave the coffin undecorated and buried Unknown Man E as quickly as possible in his own tomb. Since he was found in the DB 320 cache, we can be reasonably sure that his tomb was in the Valley of the Kings or close enough to the Valley to have been inspected by the necropolis officials in charge of caching the royal mummies. He had probably been held in high esteem by the ruling monarch (Tuthmosis II?) who had granted him the privilege of a tomb in the Royal Necropolis (much in the manner of Maihirpri.) He was discovered by the 20'th-'21'st Dynasty restorers who, considering only his rank and ignoring the sheepskin, reburied him in DB 320 with the other royal mummies.
That Maspero and his assistants did not come up with a scenario like the one just presented is probably due to their over-dramatization of Unknown Man E's facial expression. G. E. Smith remained entirely unmoved by it, however, and wrote in 1912 that any number of factors could have resulted in this type of expression at the time of death. He pointed out that other mummies who were certainly not buried alive had similarly gaping-mouthed expressions, and cited the mummy of Inhapi as an example. To this can be added the mummy of Merytamen, which, according to Bickerstaffe, looks like it's howling. (Click here to see Inhapi and Merytamen.) (Source Bibliography: BIE, series 2, no. 2, 1881; CCR, p. 39; DRN, pp. 200, 206, 212EMbm, pp. 67-68; KMT [Spring, 1999, vol. 10, no. 1], pp. 68-76; KMT [Winter 1992-1993, vol. 3, no. 4], p. 28; MiAE, p. 154; MMM, pp. 66-67; MR, p. 548-551, 778-782, 782-787; RM, p. 114ff.)

Photo Credit: RM (Cairo, 1912,) pl. XCIV. For high resolution photos of this mummy see the University of Chicago's Electronic Open Stacks copy of Smith's Royal Mummies (Cairo, 1912,) Call #: DT57.C2 vol59, plates XCIV and XCV.)
http://anubis4_2000.tripod.com/UnknownManE/ManE.htm
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MensajeTema: Re: El hombre E   Jue Mar 10, 2016 6:14 am

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MensajeTema: Re: El hombre E   Jue Mar 10, 2016 6:17 am

Pentawer


Pentawer (or Pentaweret) was an ancient Egyptian prince of the 20th dynasty, a son of Pharaoh Ramesses III and a secondary wife, Tiye.[1] He was involved in the so-called "harem conspiracy", a plot to kill his father and place Pentawer on the throne. He either killed himself or was executed following the assassination attempt

Pentawer was to be the beneficiary of the harem conspiracy, probably initiated by his mother Tiye to assassinate the pharaoh.[2] Tiye wanted her son to succeed the pharaoh, even though the chosen heir was a son of the chief queen Iset Ta-Hemdjert. According to the Judicial Papyrus of Turin Pentawer was among those who were made to stand trial for their participation in the conspiracy. It is likely that he was forced to kill himself.[1] The papyrus refers to this laconically:


They [i.e. the judges] left him in his place, he took his own life.[3]

Historian Susan Redford speculates that Pentawer, being a noble, was given the option to kill himself by taking poison and so be spared the humiliating fate of some of the other conspirators who would have been burned alive with their ashes strewn in the streets. Such punishment served to make a strong example since it emphasized the gravity of their treason for ancient Egyptians who believed that one could only attain an afterlife if one's body was mummified and preserved — rather than being destroyed by fire. In other words, not only were the criminals killed in the physical world; they did not attain an afterlife. They would have no chance of living on into the next world, and thus suffered a complete personal annihilation. By killing himself, Pentawer could avoid the harsher punishment of a second death. This could have permitted him to be mummified and move on to the afterlife. A recent study of remains believed to be his, suggest however that he was strangled or hanged. If the remains indeed are his, then he was about 18 years old at the time of his death.[4]

Probable mummy[edit]

In recent times, the Egyptologist Bob Brier has revived the old hypothesis that the famed mummy of the "Unknown Man E" found in the Deir el-Bahari cache (DB320) might be Pentawer indeed.[5] The mummy is very unusual because it appears to have been embalmed quickly, without removing the brain and viscera, and to have been placed in a cedar box, the interior of which had to be crudely hacked to widen it. Brier hypothesizes that Pentawer was mummified very rapidly and placed in an available coffin by a relative in order to give him a proper burial.[6]

Subsequent DNA analysis supported the theory that the mummy was a son of Ramesses. According to Dr. Zink, one of the scientists who undertook the test, "From our genetic analysis we could really prove the two were closely related. They share the same Y chromosome and 50% of their genetic material, which is typical of a father-son relationship
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MensajeTema: Re: El hombre E   Jue Mar 10, 2016 6:18 am

Revisiting the harem conspiracy and death of Ramesses III: anthropological, forensic, radiological, and genetic study


http://www.bmj.com/content/345/bmj.e8268


Objective To investigate the true character of the harem conspiracy described in the Judicial Papyrus of Turin and determine whether Ramesses III was indeed killed.

Design Anthropological, forensic, radiological, and genetic study of the mummies of Ramesses III and unknown man E, found together and taken from the 20th dynasty of ancient Egypt (circa 1190-1070 BC).

Results Computed tomography scans revealed a deep cut in Ramesses III’s throat, probably made by a sharp knife. During the mummification process, a Horus eye amulet was inserted in the wound for healing purposes, and the neck was covered by a collar of thick linen layers. Forensic examination of unknown man E showed compressed skin folds around his neck and a thoracic inflation. Unknown man E also had an unusual mummification procedure. According to genetic analyses, both mummies had identical haplotypes of the Y chromosome and a common male lineage.

Conclusions This study suggests that Ramesses III was murdered during the harem conspiracy by the cutting of his throat. Unknown man E is a possible candidate as Ramesses III’s son Pentawere
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MensajeTema: Re: El hombre E   Jue Mar 10, 2016 6:19 am

King Ramesses III's throat was slit, analysis reveals

Conspirators murdered Egyptian King Ramesses III by slitting his throat, experts now believe, based on a new forensic analysis.

The first CT scans to examine the king's mummy reveal a cut to the neck deep enough to be fatal.

The secret has been hidden for centuries by the bandages covering the mummy's throat that could not be removed for preservation's sake.

The work may end at least one of the controversies surrounding his death.

Precisely how he died has been hotly debated by historians.




Ancient documents including the Judicial Papyrus of Turin say that in 1155BC members of his harem attempted to kill him as part of a palace coup.

But it is less clear whether the assassination was successful. Some say it was, while other accounts at the time imply the second Pharaoh of the 20th dynasty survived the attack, at least for a short while.

Shrouded in mystery

The Judicial Papyrus tells of four separate trials and lists the punishments dished out to those involved in the plot, which included one of the king's two known wives, called Tiye, and her son Prince Pentawere - potential heir to the throne.




We were very surprised by what we found. We still cannot be sure that the cut killed him, but we think it did
Dr Albert Zink, Lead researcher

It says Pentawere, the only one of Ramesses III many sons to revolt against him, was involved in the conspiracy, found guilty at trial and then took his own life.

To find out more, Dr Albert Zink, a paleopathologist at the Institute for Mummies and the Iceman in Italy, and colleagues set out to examine the mummy of Ramesses III and the unidentified remains of another body found in a royal tomb near the Valley of the Kings in Egypt that was believed to be the king's son Pentawere.

Working out of the Egyptian Museum in Cairo where the bodies are now housed, the team ran some CT scans and DNA tests on the mummies.

Scans of Ramesses III revealed a deep, 2.7in (7cm) wide wound to the throat just under the larynx, which the medical scientists say was probably caused by a sharp blade and could have caused immediate death.

Amulet discovery

Dr Zink said: "Before now we knew more or less nothing about the destiny of Ramesses III. People had examined his body before and had done radiographs but they didn't notice any trauma. They did not have access to the CT scans that we do.


Mummy believed to be Prince Pentawere
Image caption
The mummy believed to be Prince Pentawere has unusual marks around the neck

"We were very surprised by what we found. We still cannot be sure that the cut killed him, but we think it did.

"It might have been made by the embalmers but this is very unlikely. I'm not aware of any other examples of this."

They could see a Horus eye amulet embedded in the wound - a charm most probably inserted by the ancient Egyptian embalmers during the mummification process to promote healing.

The DNA tests showed that the unidentified body of the young man, who was aged about 18 when he died, was a blood relative of Ramesses III, and in all probability the king's son Pentawere.

Dr Zink said: "From our genetic analysis we could really prove the two were closely related. They share the same Y chromosome and 50% of their genetic material, which is typical of a father-son relationship."

When they examined the body of the young man, they found he had unusual compressed skin folds and wrinkles around his neck as well as an inflated chest.

Although these changes might have occurred post-mortem in the mummy, it could indicate that the man was strangled to death, says Dr Zink.

The body was not mummified in the usual way - and was covered with a "ritually impure" goatskin - which might have been an ancient punishment in the form of a non-royal burial procedure.

"He was badly treated for a mummy," said Dr Zink.

A full report of their findings is published in the British Medical Journal
http://www.bbc.com/news/health-20755264
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MensajeTema: Re: El hombre E   Jue Mar 10, 2016 6:20 am



http://www.bbc.com/news/health-20755264
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MensajeTema: Re: El hombre E   Jue Mar 10, 2016 6:25 am

HERJUF escribió:
artículo del año 2006 de Bob Brier


The Mystery of Unknown Man E


Bob Brier


Was a mummy found in less-than-royal wrappings a disgraced prince who plotted to murder his father, Ramesses III?




On a day at the end of June 1886, Gaston Maspero, head of the Egyptian Antiquities Service, was unwrapping the mummies of kings and queens found in a cache at Deir el-Bahri, near the Valley of the Kings. Inside a plain, undecorated coffin that offered no clues to the deceased's identity, Maspero found something that shocked him. There, wrapped in a sheepskin--a ritually unclean object for ancient Egyptians--was a young man, hands and feet bound, who seemed to be screaming. There was no incision on the left abdomen, through which the embalmers normally removed the internal organs; the man had not been afforded the traditional mummification. Maspero was convinced there had been foul play, as he wrote in Les Momies Royales de Deir-el-Bahari (1889):

All those who saw him first hand thought that [he] looked as though he had been poisoned. The contraction of the abdomen and stomach, the desperate movement with which the head is thrown back, the expression of excruciating pain spread over the face hardly allow for any other explanation.
Daniel Fouquet, the physician who examined the mummy at the time, agreed that he had been poisoned and said, "the last convulsions of horrid agony can, after thousands of years, still be seen." A chemist named Mathey, who did some analyses on the mummy, felt that "the wretched man must have been deliberately asphyxiated--most likely by being buried alive."

All three investigators had let their imaginations run wild. A quarter century later, the mummy was examined by the anatomist Grafton Elliott Smith, who was far more experienced than Maspero, Fouquet, and Mathey. Smith quickly dismissed their theories about the cause of death, pointing out in The Royal Mummies (1912) that "a corpse that was dead of any complaint might fall into just such an attitude as this body has assumed." The real questions remain to this day, Who is this mummy, and how did his unembalmed body, wrapped in a sheepskin and buried in an unmarked coffin, come to rest with the greatest kings and queens of Egypt?

Many have speculated about the identity of Unknown Man E (designated such by Maspero, who assigned letters to each of the half dozen anonymous mummies in the cache). We know from the royal archives of the Hittite Empire, found a century ago at Bogazkoy in central Turkey, that a prince was sent to Egypt to marry the widow of Tutankhamun, but he was murdered on the border of Egypt. Some have suggested that Unknown Man E is that prince, and that is why he, a foreigner, was buried in a sheepskin. As evidence, they point to the Egyptian papyrus known as "The Tale of Sinuhe." In it, the pharaoh tries to convince Sinhue, a former friend and confidant who has been living abroad, to return to Egypt. The king says, "You shall not die in a foreign land...you shall not be placed in a sheepskin as they make your grave."

Another explanation that has been offered is that Unknown Man E was an important personage who died abroad, perhaps on a military campaign in a region with limited knowledge of, or access to, mummification technology. The local priests did what they could to preserve the body, added the sheepskin because it was appropriate in their beliefs, and shipped it home.

Maspero suggested that the mummy was that of Prince Pentewere, the son of Ramesses III (1185-1153 B.C.) who was involved in a conspiracy against his father. The conspirators, including Queen Tiy and her son Pentewere, were caught and either executed or, in the case of the highest-ranking ones, such as Pentewere, allowed to take their own lives. But would a convicted criminal be buried with the royal family?




The wooden coffin (left) holding an unknown mummy was found in a royal burial cache in 1881 (illustration). Hacked-out areas in it show the coffin was hastily adapted for the mummy, possibly a son of Ramesses III who tried to overthrow his father. (Pat Remler)






Much of the speculation about Unknown Man E stemmed from the fact that no one had seen the mummy in nearly a hundred years. All we have had to go on are the early reports and a few photos taken more than a century ago. In late 2004, with the permission and assistance of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, I had the opportunity to examine him. My hope was that we might find clues to the date, cause of death, and identification of the mummy and explain how such a burial could happen. While I cannot prove with the current evidence that this is the mummy of Pentewere, that identification seems to fit the curious facts of Unknown Man E.

Bob Brier is Senior Research Fellow at the C.W. Post Campus of Long Island University and is also a contributing editor to ARCHAEOLOGY




http://www.archaeology.org/0603/abstracts/mysteryman.html



En un día en el final de junio de 1886, Gaston Maspero, jefe del Servicio de Antigüedades de Egipto, estaba desenvolviendo las momias de reyes y reinas que se encuentran en una memoria caché en Deir el-Bahari, cerca del Valle de los Reyes. Dentro de un ataúd sencillo, sin decoración que no ofreció pistas sobre la identidad del fallecido, Maspero encontró algo que lo sorprendió. Allí, envuelto en una piel de oveja - un objeto impuro para los antiguos egipcios - era un hombre joven, las manos y los pies atados, que parecía estar gritando. No había ninguna incisión en el abdomen izquierdo, a través del cual los embalsamadores normalmente removidos los órganos internos; el hombre no se había dado la momificación tradicional. Maspero estaba convencido de que había habido juego sucio, como escribió en Les Momies Royales de Deir-el-Bahari
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MensajeTema: Re: El hombre E   Jue Mar 10, 2016 6:32 am

http://www.li.suu.edu/library/circulation/Dean/anth2030edMysteryOfUnknownManESpr2010.pdf

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MensajeTema: Re: El hombre E   Jue Mar 10, 2016 6:34 am

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MensajeTema: Re: El hombre E   Jue Mar 10, 2016 6:35 am

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