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 Amara west

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MensajeTema: Amara west   Jue Dic 15, 2011 1:41 pm

http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/research_projects/featured_project_amara_west/the_cemeteries/changing_burial_customs.aspx

Amara west

Grave 226: changing burial customs
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MensajeTema: Re: Amara west   Sáb Dic 17, 2011 12:29 am

ineresantes exvavaciones!!
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MensajeTema: Re: Amara west   Dom Dic 18, 2011 12:50 am

si, que son interesantes. Habia otro apartado en el foro pero como no lo encontré , puse esta última noticia aparte Smile
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MensajeTema: Re: Amara west   Miér Ene 04, 2012 2:59 am

Insights in clay: luxury products and trade at Amara West



Marie Millet, College de France, Paris


I’ve recently spent two weeks working at the British Museum, meeting colleagues working on the Amara West project, drawing pottery from last season’s excavations and also looking at archive material. Though the majority of our finds, including pottery, stay in Sudan, each season we have the opportunity to bring back samples for scientific analysis, and also to borrow vessels of particular interest for conservation and reconstruction. These will be returned to Sudan in due course.



Mycenaean stirrup jar found at Amara West

I have previously written about the shapes and purposes of the vessels we find in excavations, but another important part of working on pottery is to study the fabrics, that is, the different preparations of clay – often mixed with materials such as chaff – used to make the vessels. As the composition of clay varies from region to region, the fabrics can indicate where a vessel may have been made, which has implications for the organisation of production, transport and trade networks. I completed an initial classification on site using a hand-lense that provides magnification of 20x.


Back in the British Museum laboratories, a range of scientific techniques can be applied to refine my classification, using much higher magnifications, but also analysis of the inclusions and chemical make-up of individual samples. This research is being led by Michela Spataro of the Department of Conservation and Scientific Research. Preliminary results suggest that much of the ‘Egyptian-style’ pottery which dominates the assemblage at Amara West is actually being produced in the local region, from clay very similar to that used for the Nubian handmade cooking vessels. Yet we have no evidence for the kilns in which this pottery was made.

Conservator Rachel Swift carefully reconstructed fragments of Mycenaean stirrup jars, found in a domestic context in the southwestern corner of the town. These distinctive vessels were used to store oil or perfume, and can provide insights into the inhabitants’ access and desire for imported luxury products. Rachel’s work produced fragments of four different vessels, and Andrew Shapland, curator in the Department of Greece and Rome, brought us to a storeroom where a large collection of similar vessels from other excavations are housed. This provided us with a better sense of the date of these vessels, but also illustrated how much the decoration and pottery fabric itself could vary. Such variations can hint at whether the vessels were produced in Greece, or were imitations produced in the Levant or Egypt. We now plan chemical analyses to confirm where each vessel was made
http://blog.britishmuseum.org/2011/12/30/insights-in-clay-luxury-products-and-trade-at-amara-west/
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MensajeTema: Re: Amara west   Vie Dic 28, 2012 12:32 pm

http://blog.britishmuseum.org/2012/12/28/amara-west-season-six-is-nearly-upon-us/

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MensajeTema: Re: Amara west   Sáb Dic 29, 2012 4:06 am

puesta al día del blog
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HERJUF



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MensajeTema: Re: Amara west   Dom Dic 30, 2012 2:03 am

son unas excavaciones ejemplares, con metodologia y documentación
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MensajeTema: Re: Amara west   Vie Ene 04, 2013 12:51 am

http://blog.britishmuseum.org/tag/bones/


September 13, 2011 • 1:25 pm2 comments

Back in the lab: analysing skeletal remains from Amara West



Michaela Binder, Durham University


Since early July, I’ve been in London, finally getting to analyse the human remains we excavated last season at Amara West. The human skeleton acts as a unique database about a number of different aspects of past human life. It can reveal information about a person’s life such as sex, age at death, diet or health – even a few thousand years after the person died.

Tracing this information is part of my job as a physical anthropologist.
This does not necessarily require special technical equipment or analysis but can usually be deduced from visible inspection of the bones alone. For example, while certain shape traits in the skull and pelvis give information about whether the individual was male or female, attrition of the teeth and degenerative changes in specific parts of the hip bone can tell us how old a person was when he or she died.

Currently, I’m working on the human remains from the chamber of Grave 234. One of the more challenging tasks working on the burials from this grave is to find out how many people were actually buried there. Since the grave was re-used so many times, many of the burials had become jumbled together. Attributing all elements to an individual is unfortunately not always possible. Nevertheless, I can identify two more adult men and a juvenile, in addition to the four intact burials in the centre of the chamber.
One of the most interesting aspects of my work is when we find evidence of injuries or diseases. Even though we usually don’t find out how a person died, some injuries and diseases that occur during lifetime leave a well visible imprint on the bones. One particularly striking example from Grave 234 is a hip bone which was fractured in three different places.



Injuries of this type require high energy and are nowadays mainly associated with motor vehicle accidents or falls from great heights. Moreover they often lead to serious complications and death if the internal organs are affected as well. Although we will never know the causes of this individual’s injuries, we can speculate that it may have been a fall that occurred during building work or agricultural labour.

Such injuries are very painful but nevertheless, with two-three months rest and stabilisation, they usually heal well and do not lead to any significant walking problems. The same apparently happened in this person as the injuries are well healed, indicating that he lived on for at least several months – if not for years.










http://blog.britishmuseum.org/tag/bones/

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MensajeTema: Re: Amara west   Mar Ene 28, 2014 7:20 am

Amara West 2014: Bodies, coffins, an egg and more


Sunrise at cemetery C


Michaela Binder, Durham University
Into week 4 – the end of the short cemetery season is approaching fast. So far, we’ve made good progress in the tumulus tomb (G244) but also got some interesting results from the chamber tombs (G247 and 248) that where unfortunately looted last year.

The northern tomb (G247) was excavated by NCAM inspector Murtada Bushara who joined us for the first half of the season. Unusual for cemetery C, it only had one burial chamber on the western side of the shaft. The burials seem to date to the late New Kingdom period – according to the pottery left in the grave. The three adult burials had been completely destroyed, though luckily for us bioarchaeologists, the bones remained largely intact. In contrast to most other tombs they are extraordinarily well preserved. Therefore, they will add important information to the yet small group of New Kingdom individuals, allowing for further insights as to what life was like at ancient Amara West.





The northern tomb (G247) was excavated by NCAM inspector Murtada Bushara who joined us for the first half of the season. Unusual for cemetery C, it only had one burial chamber on the western side of the shaft. The burials seem to date to the late New Kingdom period – according to the pottery left in the grave. The three adult burials had been completely destroyed, though luckily for us bioarchaeologists, the bones remained largely intact. In contrast to most other tombs they are extraordinarily well preserved. Therefore, they will add important information to the yet small group of New Kingdom individuals, allowing for further insights as to what life was like at ancient Amara West.


In the second chamber tomb, G248, looters had been a bit less thorough. Parts of three extended skeletons were still intact on the bottom of the chamber. Mohamed Saad, NCAM inspector who has been participating in the Institute for Bioarchaeology Amara West Field School since 2012, joined us at the start of this week. He is now working to document those burials – not an easy task due to poor state of preservation!







In the second chamber tomb, G248, looters had been a bit less thorough. Parts of three extended skeletons were still intact on the bottom of the chamber. Mohamed Saad, NCAM inspector who has been participating in the Institute for Bioarchaeology Amara West Field School since 2012, joined us at the start of this week. He is now working to document those burials – not an easy task due to poor state of preservation!


In New Kingdom tumulus tomb G244, Sofie, Barbara, Maickel and I are currently working feverishly to finish excavation of all the chambers. The discovery of an intact ostrich egg used as a vessel, coffin parts and two more intact burials in chamber 244.1 kept us busy. We’ve just discovered two further burials hidden under the windblown sand in the back of the chamber…







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MensajeTema: Re: Amara west   Mar Ene 28, 2014 7:23 am




http://blog.amarawest.britishmuseum.org/2014/01/25/amara-west-2014-bodies-coffins-an-egg-and-more/
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MensajeTema: Re: Amara west   Mar Ene 28, 2014 7:55 am


Amara West 2014: 18th dynasty activity


Sieving pottery

Anna Garnett, Liverpool University

We’re in our final week of investigating the enigmatic scatter of sites lying outside the Ramesside enclosure wall of the main town at Amara West. Over the last weeks I’ve been studying the pottery coming out of two sites in the desert north of Amara West - and trying to make sense of why the sites existed, what they were used for, and importantly when they were occupied in relation to the town itself: are they earlier, contemporary or post-Ramesside?
Thankfully the amount and fine quality of the pottery coming out of the first two sites has assisted this analysis greatly. The sites excavated so far (2-R-18 and 2-R-65) featured on Andre Vila’s 1970s survey of the area, and he described them both as being New Kingdom occupation sites with evidence of Egyptian wheel-made pottery on the surface.

The forms of the ceramics from both sites, including cooking pots, tableware and storage vessels, are suggestive of the domestic nature of the occupation. Nile silt, marl and imported fabrics are all represented, as are local Nubian-made vessels in a relatively high quantity (around 10% for some of the excavated contexts): both finewares, and coarsewares used for cooking pots. This also raises interesting questions about the nature of the interactions between the Egyptians and the local Nubian population at these sites.
Thankfully the amount and fine quality of the pottery coming out of the first two sites has assisted this analysis greatly. The sites excavated so far (2-R-18 and 2-R-65) featured on Andre Vila’s 1970s survey of the area, and he described them both as being New Kingdom occupation sites with evidence of Egyptian wheel-made pottery on the surface.

The forms of the ceramics from both sites, including cooking pots, tableware and storage vessels, are suggestive of the domestic nature of the occupation. Nile silt, marl and imported fabrics are all represented, as are local Nubian-made vessels in a relatively high quantity (around 10% for some of the excavated contexts): both finewares, and coarsewares used for cooking pots. This also raises interesting questions about the nature of the interactions between the Egyptians and the local Nubian population at these sites.
http://blog.amarawest.britishmuseum.org/2014/01/



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MensajeTema: Re: Amara west   Dom Feb 09, 2014 1:21 pm

Amara West 2014: the desert survey comes to an end

Tomomi Fushiya (archaeologist), Anna Garnett (Liverpool University) and Anna Stevens (Amara West Project Curator, British Museum)

The survey excavation finished last week. We moved from the sites (2-R-18 and 2-R-65) near the palaeo-channel in the desert to a new site, 2-S-37, along the river Nile. It was a nice change of the landscape: from the rocky desert to sand dunes and a stretch of trees along the river.
para seguir leyendo: website



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MensajeTema: Re: Amara west   Jue Oct 08, 2015 6:32 am

río Nilo




Amara estaba cerca de la tercera catarata
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Contenido patrocinado




MensajeTema: Re: Amara west   Hoy a las 3:34 am

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