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 Challengers to Clovis-age impact theory missed key protocols

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MensajeTema: Challengers to Clovis-age impact theory missed key protocols   Vie Sep 21, 2012 12:37 am

reported large numbers of microspherules.

"In investigating the two common sites and a third tested only by Surovell's team, we found spherules in equal or greater abundance than did the Firestone team, and the reported enhancement was in strata dated to about 13,000 years before the present," LeCompte said. "What we've done is provide evidence that is consistent with an impact, but we don't think it proves the impact. We think there's a mystery contained in the Younger Dryas strata, and that we've provided some validation to the original research by Firestone's group."

The particles in question, the team concluded, are terrestrial as was claimed by the Firestone group, and not of meteoric origin as claimed by other challengers including Surovell's group, and are similar to metamorphic material in Earth's crust. That determination was made using electron microscopy and spectroscopy.

"These spherules have evidence of very high-temperature melting and very rapid cooling, which is characteristic of debris ejected from an impact," LeCompte said. Speherules would have melted at temperatures approaching 2,000 degrees Celsius (more than 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit), he added. Cosmic materials, including the some microspherules, regularly fall to earth from space due to meteorite ablation, but the spherules found in soils dating to 13,000 years ago are much different, he added. Other researchers had suggested that these spherules were deposited by a cosmic rain or resulted through slow, terrestrial processes occurring under ambient conditions.

LeCompte and some key collaborators wondered why Surovell didn't find any spherules, and that led them to Vogel. Many of the spherules investigated were tiny, ranging in size from 20 to 50 micrometers (microns); about the diameter of a human hair.

"The inherent difficulty in finding these small, relatively rare magnetic microspherules suggested there may be inherent limitations in human faculties that needed to be addressed, and that's how and why we sought out UO Professor Ed Vogel. His research into human cognitive capabilities proved so important in understanding both why the search was so difficult and why size-sorting was effective and important in making it easier," LeCompte said.

Vogel specializes in the ability of people to find specific items amid multiple distractions.

"A visual search is a very error-prone process," Vogel said. "This was a case of looking at millions of particles from which you are hoping to find something that might be present much less than 0.1 percent of the time." Size-sorting, he said, is vital because it is easier to find a target item with a characteristic shape and color when all of the many more-distracting objects are very similar. "It is a slow, tedious process to examine such quantities of materials with the human eyes when object sizes are extremely dissimilar."

"Science is only as good as the humans who conduct it, and this study shows how the minds of researchers can operate in some surprising ways," said Kimberly Andrews Espy, UO vice president for research and innovation, and dean of the graduate school. "Dr. Vogel's excellent work, which illustrates the importance of understanding how the human mind processes information and the consequences it can have beyond making everyday computations, reflects the University of Oregon's strengths in interdisciplinary research."

LeCompte described Surovell's study "as possibly the most damning of the reports that had challenged the original theory."

"Todd had worked very hard and couldn't find the spherules, but I think he made some fatal errors that need to be pointed out," LeCompte said. "It is instructive in that we initially made the same mistake and came to the same erroneous conclusion, but then we corrected our mistake. I would say this is a case of a missed opportunity due to their deviations from the protocol."

Two other critical protocol deviations not followed by the challengers involved the amounts of material examined and the use of microscopy techniques specified in Firestone's original research. Another two minor aspects of the protocol also were not repeated, reported LeCompte's team, which, in addition to Vogel, included an archaeologist, two materials scientists, a botanist, a periglacial geographer and an aerospace engineer.

LeCompte's team -- using the protocols of Firestone's group and electron microscopy -- additionally studied a quarry site in Topper, S.C., where Clovis-age people had made stone tools. After removing chert debris associated with tool making in soil at the depth of the Clovis occupation, LeCompte said, researchers observed virtually no spherules below it, while in soil just above the chert fragments they found a spike in the number of telltale spherules.

Further above that level, he noted, the soil layers were essentially "a dead zone" somewhat analogous to the K-T boundary, or "tombstone layer," from an extinction event that occurred 65 million years ago. At Topper, the dead zone showed almost no trace of human habitation for perhaps as long as 1,000 years duration.

"This suggests that something very dramatic happened," LeCompte said.

"The effects of such an impact would have been catastrophic on a global scale," said co-author Barrett Rock, a botanist at the University of New Hampshire. "On the order of 36 ice-age species became extinct, and the Clovis human culture eventually lost. All of this in response to dramatic changes in the vegetation at the base of the faunal food chain."



###

Co-authors on the PNAS paper with LeCompte, Vogel and Rock were Albert C. Goodyear of the South Carolina Institute of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of South Carolina; Mark N. Demitroff of the Department of Geography at the University of Delaware; Dale Batchelor and Charles Mooney of the Analytical Instrumentation Facility at North Carolina State University; and Alfred W. Seidel of Seidel Research in North Carolina.

About the University of Oregon

The University of Oregon is among the 108 institutions chosen from 4,633 U.S. universities for top-tier designation of "Very High Research Activity" in the 2010 Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. The UO also is one of two Pacific Northwest members of the Association of American Universities.

Sources: Edward Vogel, professor of psychology, 541-346-4905, vogel@uoregon.edu, and Malcolm A. LeCompte, research director, Center of Excellence in Remote Sensing Education and Research, Elizabeth City State University, 252-335-3807, lecomptem@mail.ecsu.edu

Links:

Vogel faculty page: http://psychweb.uoregon.edu/people/vogel-edward

Malcolm A. LeCompte webpage: http://nia.ecsu.edu/sp/staff/lecompte/cv.html

Barrett Rock faculty page: http://www.eos.unh.edu/Faculty/Rock

Follow UO Science on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/UniversityOfOregonScience

Note: The University of Oregon is equipped with an on-campus television studio with satellite uplink capacity, and a radio studio with an ISDN phone line for broadcast-quality radio interviews. Call the Media Contact above to begin the process.
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-09/uoo-ctc091712.php
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MensajeTema: Re: Challengers to Clovis-age impact theory missed key protocols   Vie Sep 21, 2012 12:58 am

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